Museo delle Mura

Rome, Italy

The Museo delle Mura ('museum of the walls') provides an exhibition on the walls of Rome and their building techniques, as well as the opportunity to walk along the inside of one of the best-preserved stretches of the Aurelian Wall. The museum is free of charge.

The museum in its present form, was officially opened in 1990. Prior to 1939, the Porta San Sebastiano (also known as the Porta Appia) had been open to the public but it was then taken over by Ettore Muti, the Secretary of the Italian Fascist Party. White-and-black mosaics in some rooms date back to that time. From 1970, there was a small museum connected to the internal parapet of the Aurelian Wall but this museum was only open to the public on Sundays, and, after a few years, was closed.

The museum provides a detailed history of wall construction in Rome and the surrounding areas, with information going back to one constructed in Ardea to the southeast of Rome in the 8th century. It describes the construction methods of the first Roman wall, built by Servius Tullius the legendary sixth king of Rome, the second wall constructed in the 4th century BC after invasion of Rome by the Gauls, and the Aurelian Walls, constructed in the 3rd century CE, as well as subsequent work to raise the height of those walls and improve defences, and more recent additions and changes up to the 20th century. In addition to text and diagrams, some models of walls are provided.

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Details

Founded: 1990
Category: Museums in Italy

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jesper Nielsen (10 months ago)
Small museum, but informative and interesting. Also allows for a great view and a cozy walk along the wall.
Elysia Nisan (11 months ago)
Beautiful little stop in the ancient road, free gallery. Look for the spot with the ancient large stones still in place.
Haraldur Arnar Einarsson (11 months ago)
Interesting and beautiful view on the top.
Daniel Mansie (12 months ago)
Amazing views and the gardens are a nice place to mind down.
Piotr Wargin (16 months ago)
Entrance is free. There's aircon and a toilet inside. The museum covers both towers of an old city gate and a long passage runing along city wall. There are models of ancient Rome and stages of Aurelian wall construction. Other than that the museum is suprisingly devoid of any information, to the point that I had to take out the phone and visit wikipedia to learn the history of the place, the walls and some architectural details. Fortifications are my thing so I enjoyed it a lot.
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