Apricale Village & Castle

Apricale, Italy

Apricale is a picturesque small village to the north-east of Dolceacqua in western Liguria and surrounded by forested hills, included on the list of the most beautiful villages in Italy.

The Lucertola Castle next to the square towards the top of the village dates from the 12th century and you can still see two towers and parts of the walls. The two churches also both contain interesting historical artefacts such as a medieval mosaic in the Church of the Purification of the Virgin Mary* and the 16th century altarpiece in the Oratory of Saint Bartholomew.

As well as the main square it is also the tiny alleyways, arched passageways and ancient houses and staircases that give Apricale its unique charm so allow time to explore the most obscure corners of the village!

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Historic city squares, old towns and villages in Italy

More Information

www.e-borghi.com

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michaël Baillot (12 months ago)
A faire sans aucun doute. L'approche par la route permet déjà de découvrir un village tout de pierre, planté en pleine montagne avec un charme fou. La visite est ensuite une réelle expérience : tout le village est un enchevêtrement de venelles, d'habitations en pierre, de recoins, d'escaliers improbables, de boîtes aux lettres plus créatives les unes que les autres. Un vrai moment de jeu à se perdre et se retrouver. La place principale est charmante.
Elena Morandi-Bonner (16 months ago)
A truly lovely spot especially if the weather is clear. The castle itself is open for visits at 3 PM.
Andrea Vironda (19 months ago)
Old and characteristic castle places in the middle of Apricale. It hosts a weird kind of hotel: a "spread hotel", meaning that rooms, reception and other services are widespread into the whole city
Stuart Hitchcock (2 years ago)
Beautiful location
Philippe de Coëtlogon (2 years ago)
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