In 1175 the Freiherr von Weissenburg was first mentioned as a land holder and vassal of Duke Berthold IV of Zähringen. Whether they had a castle at this time is not recorded. When he assumed the title in 1259, Rudolf III of Weissenburg expanded and repaired Weissenburg Castle to its full size. Beginning in the 13th century, the Weissenburgs began to expand their Herrschaft. Around 1250 they added Wimmis to their territory, followed by Weissenau Castle in Unterseen and the villages of Rothenfluh and Balm a few years later. However, Rudolf III sought closer relations with the Habsburgs which made an enemy of the nearby town of Bern. In 1288 he lost a battle at Wimmis against Bern and the village was plundered. Ten years later he quarreled with the Habsburgs and the Counts of Neu-Kyburg and lost control over the Rothenfluh and Weissenau Castles. Then, in 1303, he fought Bern again, this time protecting Wimmis.

Rudolf's son, Johann the Elder, was able to continue expanding the family holdings, adding part of the Hasli valley, Oberhofen Castle and Unspunnen Castle. However, in 1334 he suffered a decisive defeat against Bern and was forced to acknowledge Bern as overlord over the castle and Herrschaft. When his son Johann the Younger died in 1368, the Weissenburg line died out and their estates were inherited by the Lords of Brandis. In the mid-15th century the Lords of Brandis sold all their land holdings in the Bernese Oberland including Weissenburg Castle to Bern. Under Bernese rule, Wimmis Castle became the administrative center of the Niedersimmental and Weissenburg was abandoned. Over the following centuries the castle walls were demolished to provide construction material for houses in the village.

The castle is located on a steep hill west of Weissenburg village near the confluence of the Bunsch stream and the Simme river. The castle is protected on three sides by the steep hill, while the gentler west side is guarded by a still visible ditch. Above the ditch portions of a round tower are still visible. The massive south wall and gate are still standing. East of the castle, the foundations of several small houses of the medieval town can be seen.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Borowski Łukasz (40 days ago)
z zamku nie wiele zostało
ma vision des choses le guide et voyageur (10 months ago)
Pretty corner
ma vision des choses le guide et voyageur (10 months ago)
Pretty corner
Heinz Lichti (2 years ago)
Roland Garoni (2 years ago)
Intersannte Gegend zum Wandern.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Angelokastro

Angelokastro is a Byzantine castle on the island of Corfu. It is located at the top of the highest peak of the island"s shoreline in the northwest coast near Palaiokastritsa and built on particularly precipitous and rocky terrain. It stands 305 m on a steep cliff above the sea and surveys the City of Corfu and the mountains of mainland Greece to the southeast and a wide area of Corfu toward the northeast and northwest.

Angelokastro is one of the most important fortified complexes of Corfu. It was an acropolis which surveyed the region all the way to the southern Adriatic and presented a formidable strategic vantage point to the occupant of the castle.

Angelokastro formed a defensive triangle with the castles of Gardiki and Kassiopi, which covered Corfu"s defences to the south, northwest and northeast.

The castle never fell, despite frequent sieges and attempts at conquering it through the centuries, and played a decisive role in defending the island against pirate incursions and during three sieges of Corfu by the Ottomans, significantly contributing to their defeat.

During invasions it helped shelter the local peasant population. The villagers also fought against the invaders playing an active role in the defence of the castle.

The exact period of the building of the castle is not known, but it has often been attributed to the reigns of Michael I Komnenos and his son Michael II Komnenos. The first documentary evidence for the fortress dates to 1272, when Giordano di San Felice took possession of it for Charles of Anjou, who had seized Corfu from Manfred, King of Sicily in 1267.

From 1387 to the end of the 16th century, Angelokastro was the official capital of Corfu and the seat of the Provveditore Generale del Levante, governor of the Ionian islands and commander of the Venetian fleet, which was stationed in Corfu.

The governor of the castle (the castellan) was normally appointed by the City council of Corfu and was chosen amongst the noblemen of the island.

Angelokastro is considered one of the most imposing architectural remains in the Ionian Islands.