The original small church was built from 1341 to 1346 to replace the old fort on the site. From 1480 to 1483 the city added a tower and from 1493 to 1504, a new nave was added.

After the Protestant Reformation in 1529, the Nydeggkirche was transformed into a warehouse for barrels, timber and grain, but in 1566 again served as worship space. Beginning in 1566 it was cleaned out and minor renovations made to the windows and walls. However, in 1568 the bell tower roof caught fire and was destroyed. The new roof was finished and the damaged clock work repaired by the end of May 1571. The large wrought iron cross which tops the main spire was built by Caspar Brükessel during the same time. The current tower's appearance mostly dates back to the 1571 reconstruction.

The later changes to the tower were fairly minor. For example, in 1625 four small embrasures or firing slits were broken out of the tower to help defend the city gate and in 1631 eight copper waterspouts were added to the roof.

Until 1721 it was a branch church of the Münster of Bern. Today's congregation forms part of the Reformed Churches of the Canton Bern-Jura-Solothurn.

In 1863, the church was extended to the west and an entrance from the Nydeggbrücke (Nydegg Bridge) was added. Then, from 1951 to 1953 a total renovation happened.

In 1956, bronze reliefs by Perincioli were inspired by medieval role models in front of San Zeno in Verona and the Cathedral of Hildesheim.

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Address

Nydeggasse 6, Bern, Switzerland
See all sites in Bern

Details

Founded: 1341
Category: Religious sites in Switzerland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Walter w. Küpfer (11 months ago)
Nice place to visit and walk around..
Karlo Beyer Location Scouting (11 months ago)
At this point, the city of Bern originated, the origin was a fortified weir on the top of the Aare loop. Therefore, you can call the Nydeggkirche and its place as the nucleus of the city and even today, this part of the old town has retained its historic flair.
Tomo Tor (11 months ago)
Not a big size, but quite nice acoustics. I was listening to 10 winds, Sinfonietta #108 by Joakhim Raff, fitted very well. Also there is an orfan player who practices in the dark time, so by good weather one can juat sit outside the window and enjoy
CLAUDE CRUTCHLEY (18 months ago)
Nice Ancient church. Nice to know people serve God for centuries
Jaime Porta (2 years ago)
Really old church that makes you see how was the city many centuries ago. The views from the bridge are very interesting, having all the old town around you and the bears just behind.
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