The original small church was built from 1341 to 1346 to replace the old fort on the site. From 1480 to 1483 the city added a tower and from 1493 to 1504, a new nave was added.

After the Protestant Reformation in 1529, the Nydeggkirche was transformed into a warehouse for barrels, timber and grain, but in 1566 again served as worship space. Beginning in 1566 it was cleaned out and minor renovations made to the windows and walls. However, in 1568 the bell tower roof caught fire and was destroyed. The new roof was finished and the damaged clock work repaired by the end of May 1571. The large wrought iron cross which tops the main spire was built by Caspar Brükessel during the same time. The current tower's appearance mostly dates back to the 1571 reconstruction.

The later changes to the tower were fairly minor. For example, in 1625 four small embrasures or firing slits were broken out of the tower to help defend the city gate and in 1631 eight copper waterspouts were added to the roof.

Until 1721 it was a branch church of the Münster of Bern. Today's congregation forms part of the Reformed Churches of the Canton Bern-Jura-Solothurn.

In 1863, the church was extended to the west and an entrance from the Nydeggbrücke (Nydegg Bridge) was added. Then, from 1951 to 1953 a total renovation happened.

In 1956, bronze reliefs by Perincioli were inspired by medieval role models in front of San Zeno in Verona and the Cathedral of Hildesheim.

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Address

Nydeggasse 6, Bern, Switzerland
See all sites in Bern

Details

Founded: 1341
Category: Religious sites in Switzerland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ognian Dimitrov (5 months ago)
The church is located near the river and looks very nice. There is also a very interesting bronze door.
brightrail Bb (6 months ago)
Very beautiful stained windows, right in the old town!
Boyko TK (9 months ago)
Holy temple with remarkable and stunning architecture and tower visible from afar!
Donavin Andrews (10 months ago)
Very beautiful old church. Simple but very nice. Worth a stop to enjoy the architecture and organ.
Walter w. Küpfer (2 years ago)
Nice place to visit and walk around..
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