Roma Abbey was built in 1164 by Cistercian monks. The monks established a religious and agricultural centre for the entire Baltic Sea region. After the Reformation in the early 16th century, the monastery was abandoned. It was then under the Danish Crown. The monastery building was partly demolished and the church was used as a stable. In 1645, through the peace treaty in Brömsebro, Gotland became Swedish again.

In 1733, County Governor Johan Dietrich Grönhagen, build a new stately residence, using material from the old monastery in the construction. No major changes have been made since then. It was used as the residence for the County Governor until 1822. Today impressive ruins are well known for the Shakesperian plays that are performed here every summer.

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Details

Founded: 1164
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

www.sfv.se
enjoysweden.se

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Emelie Happel (2 months ago)
It was amazing experience at same time cold.
Andreea Galetschi (4 months ago)
Charming place, lots to do. Great giftshop.
christoffer roy (8 months ago)
Currently closed due to covid but beatuful place for a picknick
Bcn76 (15 months ago)
History place outside the Visby ??⚓
Jari Saarinen (23 months ago)
A really ancient place. Really magnificent, must see.
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