Roma Abbey was built in 1164 by Cistercian monks. The monks established a religious and agricultural centre for the entire Baltic Sea region. After the Reformation in the early 16th century, the monastery was abandoned. It was then under the Danish Crown. The monastery building was partly demolished and the church was used as a stable. In 1645, through the peace treaty in Brömsebro, Gotland became Swedish again.

In 1733, County Governor Johan Dietrich Grönhagen, build a new stately residence, using material from the old monastery in the construction. No major changes have been made since then. It was used as the residence for the County Governor until 1822. Today impressive ruins are well known for the Shakesperian plays that are performed here every summer.

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Details

Founded: 1164
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

www.sfv.se
enjoysweden.se

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anders Lindgren (13 months ago)
In the summer, this place is a outdoors theatre. The old monastery ruins is usually part of the scenery. Going here other parts of the year is a pleasant experience.
TheEvdriver (14 months ago)
A very nice and romantic ruin of a cloister. It has a quite long tradition as a summer theater. This makes some rooms not visible for tourists. But on the other hand it provides steady income for renovations and running costs. Shops were pricey, therefore the visit outside and in the manor was free. Cafe was nice, good cake.
Bernard Morey (15 months ago)
You can spend anywhere between an hour and a whole day here. The ruins are scenic and there is an interesting museum. I think there is a tourist train to Roma but don't hold me to that. There are pleasant walks in the vicinity. It's off the tourist trail so there probably won't be many people about during the week.
Debbie Lundahl (16 months ago)
Good show and environment....
Valter Albin (16 months ago)
Saw a great play here! Its a wonderful scene for a summer showing.
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