St. Catherine Church

Penne, France

St. Catherine Church has undergone numerous changes over the centuries. It was originally built around the end of the 13th century, in the Occitan Gothic style; several 13th century features remain, such as the holy water stoup. It formed part of the defensive system of town walls and was at the entrance to the village.

During the Wars of Religion in the 16th century, the building was badly damaged, and the church bells were thrown into a well (but they were later retrieved and one was able to be restored).

It was re-roofed and restored during the reign of Henry IV (1589-1610).

Each century since has seen intermittent efforts to restore and improve the church, including a major re-orientation of the building in 1876.

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Address

Le Village, Penne, France
See all sites in Penne

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

MC VULCAIN (16 months ago)
Nice modern stained glass
MC VULCAIN (16 months ago)
Nice modern stained glass
Jordi Ustrell (2 years ago)
Well preserved
Jordi Ustrell (2 years ago)
Well preserved
Brian Kennan (2 years ago)
Lovely 13th century church, very well explained and presented for visitors. Very interesting to see how it was restored, having formerly been badly damaged in the religious wars. You can see parts of the former structure and vaulted ceilings.
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