Monastery of San Martiño Pinario

Santiago de Compostela, Spain

The monastery of San Martiño Pinario is the second largest monastery in Spain after San Lorenzo de El Escorial. Little remains of the original medieval buildings (founded around 899 AD), as the monastery has been largely rebuilt since the sixteenth century.

Throughout the Middle Ages the monastery grew so that by the end of the fifteenth century the monastery became the richest and most powerful of Galicia. This brought about the almost complete reconstruction starting in 1587.

The facade of the church, oriented to the west and open to the square of San Martín, presents a cover with structure of great altarpiece of stone divided in three bodies and three streets separated by fluted columns and is dedicated to the exaltation of the Virgin Mary and of The Benedictine order.

The fronton finish has a relief of Saint Martin on horseback distributing his coat with a poor, patron of the convent.

Its present aspect is due, in addition to the initial design of Mateo López, to subsequent interventions. Thus, in the 17th century Peña del Toro enlarged it adding two towers to the sides, which did not rise above the church by the opposition of the cathedral chapter, and opening two side windows, adorned with the first fruit strings of the Baroque Compostelan, antecedent of what would later be used profusely by Domingo de Andrade in the Clock Tower of the cathedral and in the Casa de la Parra of the plaza de la Quintana.

With the seizure in the year 1835 was devoted to various functions and since 1868 it became the seat of the seminar most of the Archdiocese of Santiago.

Today it continues as seminary Compostela and site of the Department of Theology and Social Work. Formerly a part of the building was used as a residence hall, but at the end of the academic year 2007-2008 was closed in order to carry out structural reforms, which topped and give way to reopen for the 2011-2012 academic year RUSMP.

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Founded: 1587
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Claudia Rodriguez (5 months ago)
Plenty of delights for Christmas time.
Rachele (11 months ago)
Special price for pilgrims, for spartan but clean and comfortable bedrooms. Near the centre and the Cathedral, really nice continental breakfast. Recommended.
René Kalb (Rk81) (15 months ago)
Great Hotel! Best location after HOSTAL D. L R C. Good service, nice staff. I stayed 15 times there... For me my favorite!!!
Lorna Davison (3 years ago)
Elegance and Serenity. Paid entrance but well worth it.
Doug A (3 years ago)
A truly under publicized and under appreciated sight in Santiago de Compostela. I had walked by this museum many times and actually stayed next door for several days. Finally, I decided to visit on a whim and was amazed at the size and contents. It is probably more impressive than some cathedrals, and there seem to be very few visitors. Entrance is 3 or 4 Euros, but it is definitely worth it. A very beautiful place.
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