Monastery of San Paio de Antealtares

Santiago de Compostela, Spain

King Alfonso II founded the Monastery of San Paio de Antealtares in the year 830. It fell into decay at the end of the 13th century, and in ruins, the Catholic Monarchs eliminated it and included it into S. Martín Pinario. In 1495, Gómez de Marzoa´s efforts to set up a college for poor students led to the monastery becoming Compostela´s first school and the origin of Galicia´s Renaissance University. The Order of benedictine nuns occupied it as of 1499.

The present-day building, in baroque style, appeared between 1599 and 1744. Fernández Lechuga the closing wall of La Quintana as a large, undecorated canavas, gicving the sensation of perfection and grandeur; Velasco Agüero built the other walls of the cloister and doorway facade, with a monumental doorwayframed by four giant order Doric columns; Fernando de Casas y Novoa extended the building to the Carros Gateway, finished by Lucas Ferro Caaveiro and known as 'Puerta de la Borriquita' (the Donkey Gateway), thanks to the relief image of the Flight to Egypt (Francisco de Lens, circa. 1750). Church (Friar Gabriel de las Casas, 1703-07) in cut-stone granite and tiled, two-sided roof. Greek cross ground plan extended at the western end to accommodate the choir. Simple, monumental facade with the figure of St. Pelayo Martyr. Interior covered with a dome over pendentives. Main retable by Castro Canseco.

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Details

Founded: 1599
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

www.turismo.gal

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marina Lopez (4 months ago)
The best Santiago cake and almond donuts I've ever had. Behind the church, is the combento from 9 to 7 daily. They make them every day, they are very oculomics and a natural product made by the nuns. You really won't regret the donuts not the cake.
salamanca P (4 months ago)
I went for the cake and the church surprised me. Next to the cathedral it is a must because it does not steal more than a few minutes. The kindness of the Benedictine nuns is something that you take as a gift. I have not tried the cake for 12 euros yet but it is sure to be spectacular. It has a museum. I invite you to see it for just over one euro.
María José Mosquera Miranda (12 months ago)
It is a beautiful monastery, with a beautiful church, a wonderful museum and special Masses where Vespers are sung every afternoon He has dedicated many years to the education of children with nursery and dining room.
Michele Howard (2 years ago)
A must do on finishing your Camino.
He Wi (2 years ago)
Facade was really beautiful and impressive but inside was a bit disappointing as it just looked so ordinary. It was a pity, really. Because it was raining, there were not too many people, which was definitely great for those like to take picture with no/minimum number of people ;)
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