Monastery of San Paio de Antealtares

Santiago de Compostela, Spain

King Alfonso II founded the Monastery of San Paio de Antealtares in the year 830. It fell into decay at the end of the 13th century, and in ruins, the Catholic Monarchs eliminated it and included it into S. Martín Pinario. In 1495, Gómez de Marzoa´s efforts to set up a college for poor students led to the monastery becoming Compostela´s first school and the origin of Galicia´s Renaissance University. The Order of benedictine nuns occupied it as of 1499.

The present-day building, in baroque style, appeared between 1599 and 1744. Fernández Lechuga the closing wall of La Quintana as a large, undecorated canavas, gicving the sensation of perfection and grandeur; Velasco Agüero built the other walls of the cloister and doorway facade, with a monumental doorwayframed by four giant order Doric columns; Fernando de Casas y Novoa extended the building to the Carros Gateway, finished by Lucas Ferro Caaveiro and known as 'Puerta de la Borriquita' (the Donkey Gateway), thanks to the relief image of the Flight to Egypt (Francisco de Lens, circa. 1750). Church (Friar Gabriel de las Casas, 1703-07) in cut-stone granite and tiled, two-sided roof. Greek cross ground plan extended at the western end to accommodate the choir. Simple, monumental facade with the figure of St. Pelayo Martyr. Interior covered with a dome over pendentives. Main retable by Castro Canseco.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1599
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

www.turismo.gal

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Juan Antonio Cervantes (2 months ago)
La tarta de Santiago que realizan las Hermanas la mejor que comí con diferencia ,los almendrados buenísimos todo envuelto y preparado para viajar sin problema.
Jesus Grasa Perez (3 months ago)
The Baroque Church is very beautiful and the mass sung by the Benedictine nuns at 7:30 p.m. is beautiful.
Marina Lopez (11 months ago)
The best Santiago cake and almond donuts I've ever had. Behind the church, is the combento from 9 to 7 daily. They make them every day, they are very oculomics and a natural product made by the nuns. You really won't regret the donuts not the cake.
Marina Lopez (11 months ago)
The best Santiago cake and almond donuts I've ever had. Behind the church, is the combento from 9 to 7 daily. They make them every day, they are very oculomics and a natural product made by the nuns. You really won't regret the donuts not the cake.
salamanca P (11 months ago)
I went for the cake and the church surprised me. Next to the cathedral it is a must because it does not steal more than a few minutes. The kindness of the Benedictine nuns is something that you take as a gift. I have not tried the cake for 12 euros yet but it is sure to be spectacular. It has a museum. I invite you to see it for just over one euro.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Fisherman's Bastion

Fisherman's Bastion is a terrace in neo-Gothic and neo-Romanesque style situated on the Buda bank of the Danube, on the Castle hill in Budapest, around Matthias Church. It was designed and built between 1895 and 1902 on the plans of Frigyes Schulek. Construction of the bastion destabilised the foundations of the neighbouring 13th century Dominican Church which had to be pulled down. Between 1947–48, the son of Frigyes Schulek, János Schulek, conducted the other restoration project after its near destruction during World War II.

From the towers and the terrace a panoramic view exists of Danube, Margaret Island, Pest to the east and the Gellért Hill.

Its seven towers represent the seven Magyar tribes that settled in the Carpathian Basin in 896.

The Bastion takes its name from the guild of fishermen that was responsible for defending this stretch of the city walls in the Middle Ages. It is a viewing terrace, with many stairs and walking paths.

A bronze statue of Stephen I of Hungary mounted on a horse, erected in 1906, can be seen between the Bastion and the Matthias Church. The pedestal was made by Alajos Stróbl, based on the plans of Frigyes Schulek, in Neo-Romanesque style, with episodes illustrating the King's life.