At the beginning of 1760, Archbishop Rajoy comissioned Lucas Ferro Caaveiro to design the plans to erect a building in Plaza del Obradoiro, to house the Local Council, the prison and the Confessors Seminary. Claims brought by the Hospital Real delayed the work and caused a change in architect and a modification to the extension and height of the building. Finally, the French engineer Charles Lemaur began the work in 1767.

Pazo de Raxoi stands on a rectangular ground plan that closes off the Plaza del Obradoiro, built in granite ashlar and its Neoclassical style is clearly influenced by French Classicism. It consists of three floors and an attic. Its symmetrical main facade, with a portico with architraves on the lower floor, highlights the central and side structures with adjoining Colossal columns finished in pediments, the central one triangular and the side one semi-circular. On the tympanum of the central one there is an image of the battle of Clavijo, and is topped by a sculpture of St. James the Apostle on horseback, both by José Ferreiro.It is presently the Local Council building and Presidency of the Autonomous Governmen.

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Founded: 1767
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Spain

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Mark Auchincloss (2 years ago)
Majestic building from 18th Century built for Archbishop Raxoi. Used as Council Office & Xunta departments.
Julio Baigorria (4 years ago)
Beautiful moment
Sandra Silva (4 years ago)
Loved
Simon Kaiblinger (5 years ago)
Cool
Santiago Martinez (6 years ago)
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