Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden

Sandemar Castle

At the beginning of the Kalmar Union age Sandemar was owned by the Teutonic Order of Livonia. Erik Axelsson Tott bought all the Order's property in Sweden in 1467. During the 1500s the ownership was unknown. In the 1600s the Sandemar belonged to families Oxenstierna, Bonde and Falkenberg. The Royal Council and president Gabriel Falkenberg completed the present main building around the year 1693. Sandemar is today privatel ...
Founded: 1693 | Location: Haninge, Sweden

Snogeholm Castle

Snogeholm farm dates from the 16th century and it was owned by Thott, Brahe, Marsvin and Bille families. In the 1690s Christian Bille built the new main building between two detached wings. The current castle was built by Erik Claes Piper in 1870. The French Rococo style building has two storeys and three towers. The German Emperor Wilhelm II visited in Snogeholm in 1899 and 1902. Today Snogeholm castle hosts a hotel and ...
Founded: 1870 | Location: Sjöbo, Sweden

Kaggeholm Castle

The site where Kaggeholm Palace is located was first mentioned in a document in 1287. During the 1500s the farm was owned by members of the families Grip and Bååt. The farm was originally called Vettersjö, but was named by Swedish Count Lars Kagg (1595-1661) who bought the manor during 1647. Kagg was a political ally of King Gustavus Adolphus, a member of the Privy Council of Sweden and Field Marshal duri ...
Founded: 1725 | Location: Ekerö, Sweden

Västanå Manor

The history of Våstana estate dates from the 1590s and the current main building was mainly reconstructed in 1767. Since 1948 it has been a hotel and restautant.
Founded: 1767 | Location: Gränna, Sweden

Hjularöd Castle

Hjularöd Castle was first mentioned in 1391, but the current castle was built in 1894-1897. It was built on command of the former owner, chamberlain Hans Gustaf Toll. French medieval castles, the château de Pierrefonds in particular, were inspiration for the castle when architects Isak Gustaf Clason and Lars Israel Wahlman designed it. Outside scenes from the television series Mysteriet på Greveholm (The ...
Founded: 1894-1897 | Location: Eslöv, Sweden

Grönsö Castle

Grönsö (or Grönsöö) Castle was built in 1607-1610 by the Privy Council Johan Skytte. The building was constructed of brick and granite in a French style with pitched roof, ridge turrets and four rectangular corner towers. The ground floor can still be seen today with well-preserved interiors and painted ceilings from the 1600s. Family Skytte owned Grönsö throughout the 1600s until it wa ...
Founded: 1607-1610 | Location: Enköping, Sweden

Näsbyholm Castle

Näsbyholm Castle was known since the 14th century as a fortified manor house. The current main building corps de logis was erected 1957 on the old castle land lot, a castle that was demolished 1865.
Founded: 1957 | Location: Skurup, Sweden

Västanfors Manor

The Västanfors manor house is in a delightful setting on the Strömsholm canal. The ironworks owners and managers with links to Västanfors have lived and worked here since the 17th century. The smelting house was demolished in the 1920s, as the entire operation had been moved to the Fagersta works. The old manor house was pulled down to make room for the rebuilding of the Strömsholm canal in the mid-180 ...
Founded: 19th century | Location: Fagersta, Sweden

Elleholm Manor

Elleholm Manor (Elleholms hovgård) history dates back to the Middle Ages. In the 15th century it was owned by knight Axel Pedersson (Tott). The current manor house was built in 1730 and around 1850 it was a residence for mistress of Fredrik VII of Denmark. There is also a small manor church (1713) which is a popular wedding church.
Founded: 1730 | Location: Mörrum, Sweden

Sävstaholm Palace

Sävstaholm palace was built during 1666 by Gustav Larsson Sparre (1625-1689), a Swedish baron, diplomat, and governor. Since 1968, it has been owned by Vingåker Municipality.
Founded: 1666 | Location: Vingåker, Sweden

Fållnäs Manor

The written history of Fållnäs estate begins in 1291, when it was donated to Skokloster abbey by Magnus Johansson (Ängel). The current manor complex was built between 1780 and 1807 according the design of Erik Palmstedt. It consists of several annexes, but the planned main building was never completed. Today Fållnäs hosts an art gallery with a cafe.
Founded: 1780 | Location: Nynäshamn, Sweden

Adelsnäs Manor

Adelsnäs (formerly known as Näs) manor was named after Johan Adelswärd, who acquired the local copper mine in 1781. The present manor building was built Theodor Adelswärd in 1916-1920. English garden and parks around the Bysjön lake are popular when open to the public. The unique detail is a “Sun Cannon”, which is installed in a red brick tower from 1853. It is a 6-pound cannon from t ...
Founded: 1916-1920 | Location: Åtvidaberg, Sweden

Ulvåsa Manor

Ulvåsa, or Ulfåsa, is an mansion by lake Boren outside Motala in Östergötland, Sweden. The construction of the present mansion began in the 16th century. In the early 19th century a third floor was added and it got its present architecture. The medieval Ulvåsa was situated a few kilometers west of the present mansion. Today, there are ruins left of the manor where SaintBridget of Sweden lived ...
Founded: 1740 | Location: Motala, Sweden

Arvfursten Palace

Arvfursten Palace (Arvfurstens palats) is located at Gustav Adolfs Torg in central Stockholm. Designed by Erik Palmstedt, the palace was originally the private residence of Princess Sophia Albertina. It was built 1783-1794 and declared a historical monument in 1935 and subsequently restored by Ivar Tengbom in 1948-52. Since 1906 the palace has served as the seat of the Ministry for Foreign Affairs. The palace is facing t ...
Founded: 1783-1794 | Location: Stockholm, Sweden

Esplunda Manor

Esplunda estate was established in 1616. The current manor house was built in 1872 and it was enlarged to the Baroque-style appearance in 1904. Wings date from the 18th century. Esplunda has a very significant library with 15,000 books and manuscripts dating from the 1600-1700s.
Founded: 17th century | Location: Örebro, Sweden

Östrabo Bishop’s House

Östrabo biskopsgård (Bishop’s House) consists of main building (built 1792-1796) and four annexes. It was built by bishop Olof Wallquist.
Founded: 1792-1796 | Location: Växjö, Sweden

Ekholmen Country House

This country house, dating back to the late 18th century, is covered entirely with slabs of slate. On the upper storey, there are three rooms which are furnished just as they were when King Karl XIV Johan spent the night there on his travels to Norway. Open by agreement only, tel. 0530-20475.
Founded: 18th century | Location: Dals Rostock, Sweden

Trystorp Manor

Trystorp is a Swedish estate in Lekeberg. To the south of the manor, there is a nature reserve which is open to the public, with a rich fauna and many old oaks. The estate was established by Biskop Kort Rogge in 1495, who bought land in the area. The Livonian nobleman Henrik von Falkenberg was subsequently awarded Trystorp as a fief. In the 16th century, King Charles IX of Sweden was a frequent guest at Trystorp. The Fa ...
Founded: 1495 | Location: Fjugesta, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Beersel Castle

The moated castle at Beersel is one of the few exceptionally well-preserved examples of medieval fortifications in Belgium. It remains pretty much as it must have appeared in the 15th century. Remarkably, it was never converted into a fortified mansion. A visitor is able to experience at first-hand how it must have felt to live in a heavily fortified castle in the Middle Ages.

The castle was built in around 1420 as a means of defence on the outer reaches of Brussels. The tall, dense walls and towers were intended to hold any besiegers at bay. The moat and the marshy ground along its eastern, southern and western edges made any attack a formidable proposition. For that reason, any attackers would have chosen its weaker northern defences where the castle adjoins higher lying ground. But the castle was only taken and destroyed on one occasion in 1489, by the inhabitants of Brussels who were in rebellion against Maximilian of Austria.

After being stormed and plundered by the rebels it was partially rebuilt. The pointed roofs and stepped gables are features which have survived this period. The reconstruction explains why two periods can be identified in the fabric of the edifice, particularly on the outside.

The red Brabant sandstone surrounds of the embrasures, now more or less all bricked up, are characteristic of the 15th century. The other embrasures, edged with white sandstone, date from the end of the 15th century. They were intended for setting up the artillery fire. The merlons too are in white sandstone. The year 1617 can be clearly seen in the foundation support on the first tower. This refers to restorations carried out at the time by the Arenberg family.

Nowadays, the castle is dominated by three massive towers. The means of defence follow the classic pattern: a wide, deep moat surrounding the castle, a drawbridge, merlons on the towers, embrasures in the walls and in the towers, at more or less regular intervals, and machiolations. Circular, projecting towers ensured that attacks from the side could be thwarted. If the enemy were to penetrate the outer wall, each tower could be defended from embrasures facing onto the inner courtyard.

The second and third towers are flanked by watchtowers from which shots could be fired directly below. Between the second and third tower are two openings in the walkway on the wall. It is not clear what these were used for. Were these holes used for the disposing of rubbish, or escape routes. The windows on the exterior are narrow and low. All light entering comes from the interior. The few larger windows on the exterior date from a later period. It is most probable that the third tower - the highest - was used as a watchtower.