Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden

Görväln House

Görväln House is documented from the 1460s when it was owned by the Archdiocese of Uppsala. After the Protestant Reformation in 1520, Görväln became a kronohemman, owned by King Johan III until 1571, when Johan III gave it away to the nobleman Antonius de Palma and his family. Between 1605–1661 Görväln was owned by the Swedish noble family Bjelke. During the Bjelke era the main building ...
Founded: 17th century | Location: Järfälla, Sweden

Solliden Palace

Solliden Palace was completed in 1906. The Italian-style country house was designed by Torben Grut. Today it is owned by King Carl XVI Gustav of Sweden and used as the royal summer residence. Solliden palace is open to the public from May to September.
Founded: 1906 | Location: Borgholm, Öland, Sweden

Nääs Castle

Nääs Castle is a 17th century mansion near Gothenburg, Sweden. In the later half of the 19th century Nääs became world renowned through its Crafts College and for more than 50 years it was regarded as 'Swedens window to the world'. According to legend, King Kristian II built a castle for hunting parties at Näs. The first historical evidence on Nääs Estate however, derives from record da ...
Founded: 17th century | Location: Floda, Sweden

Ekebyhov Castle

The estate of Ekebyhov was created by Klas Horn (1583-1632) in the 1620s by merging farms Ekeby, Hovgården and Gällsta. Horn built a stone castle on three floors, which now no longer exists. The existing palace is a wooden two-storey building built in the 1670s, when Field Marshal Count Carl Gustaf Wrangel acquired Ekebyhov. Wrangel's death in 1676 halted the construction and it was resumed in 1701, when Baron ...
Founded: 1670-1701 | Location: Ekerö, Sweden

Kristineberg Palace

Kristineberg Palace in Kungsholmen was built around 1750 for the businessman R. Schröder. The palace was surrounded by parks and the property included a great deal of the surrounding land. In 1864 the property was bought by the Swedish Freemasonry and additional construction on the palace was made. Stockholm City bought the land in 1921 and started building the Kristineberg district, and today part of the palace is u ...
Founded: 1750 | Location: Stockholm, Sweden

Rånäs Manor

The Rånäs manor (or Rånäs castle) was built in the 1850s by the Reuterskiöld family at the site of a 17th century manor, torn down after the completion of the present manor. Rånäs manor was designed by the leading architect of the time, professor Per Axel Nyström. Rånäs manor had a charter from 1774 for the yearly production of 1500 ship pounds (260,000 kg) of bar iron ...
Founded: 1850's | Location: Rånäs, Norrtälje, Sweden

Svartsjö Palace

The location of Svartsjö Palace (Svartsjö Slott) has housed several royal buildings. During medieval times there was a stone house where prominent Swedish royalty lived. Gustav Vasa and his sons Erik and Johan erected a lavish renaissance palace with a round inner courtyard. It was at least partly designed by Willem Boy and completed in 1580 but burnt down in 1687. The remaining building material was shipped to ...
Founded: 1734-1739 | Location: Svartsjö, Sweden

Steninge Palace

The Baroque-style Steninge Palace was built 1694-1698 to the design of architect Nicodemus Tessin the Younger, the palace is directly inspired by Château de Vaux-le-Vicomte in France, and has a reputation in Sweden as one of the most elegant examples of Baroque mansions. Steninge Palace was completed in 1705. The history of Steninge began in the end of 1200’s when the first known settlement was established. I ...
Founded: 1680-1705 | Location: Märsta, Sweden

Strömsholm Palace

Strömsholm Palace, sometimes called Strömsholm Castle is a Swedish royal palace. The baroque palace is built on the site of a fortress from the 1550s, located on an island in the Kolbäcksån river at the west end of Lake Mälaren. The palace has interiors from the 18th century and an important collection of Swedish paintings. King Gustav Vasa had a fortress built at Strömsholm in the 1550s. T ...
Founded: 1669-1674 | Location: Strömsholm, Sweden

Övedskloster Castle

In the Middle Ages Övedskloster was a Premonstratensian monastery. In the 16th century Reformation it was moved to Danish Crown. The original castle was destroyed by fire in the beginning of the 17thc century.The current Övedskloster Castle was built in 1765-1776 by Hans Ramel. It was designed by Swedish architect Carl Hårleman. The main building represents the French Rococo style and is built of red sands ...
Founded: 1765-1776 | Location: Sjöbo, Sweden

Alster Manor

The history of Alster Manor begins from 1397, but the current main building was built in 1772 and reconstructed in 1832. The poet Gustaf Fröding born in Alster in 1860. Today it is a museum.
Founded: 1772 | Location: Karlstad, Sweden

Orenäs Castle

Örenäs Castle is German Baroque style castle was raised in 1914-1918. It's now a hotel and conference centre with a public restaurant. During WWII Danish and Estonian refugees were hosted here. It's known to be the youngest castle in both Scania and Sweden.
Founded: 1914-1918 | Location: Landskrona, Sweden

Sturehof Castle

The history of Sturehof manor date from the Middle Ages. The small village was owned by count and stateman Svante Sture, who was murdered by King Erik XIV. His son Mauritz Sture named the manor as Sturehof. In the next to centuries Sturehov was owned by several powerful noble families like Oxenstiernas and Wrangels. Johan Liljencrantz , Gustav III's "Finance minister", acquired the property in 1778 as a summer lodge. The ...
Founded: 1770s | Location: Salem, Sweden

Karlslund Manor

Originally, in the 16th century, the site of the Manor House and gardens was used for royal farm buildings and Karlslund was mainly concerned with agriculture. The present Karlslund Manor House was built between 1804 and 1809 by Christian Günther. In 1819 a later owner, Carl Anckarsvärd, had the manor house rebuilt and altered to the appearance we know today. The architect behind this work was the famous Carl Ch ...
Founded: 1804-1809 | Location: Örebro, Sweden

Kattlunds Farm

The Kattlunds farm (Kattlunds Gård) was established in the Middle Ages. There are still some original buildings remaining (like stable), the newest ones were built in the 19th century. The ruins of medieval defense tower are located close to the farm. Kattlunds is owned today by Gotland Museum and is open to the public in summer season. There is also a giftshop and café.
Founded: | Location: Kattlunds, Sweden

Elleholm Manor

Elleholm Manor (Elleholms hovgård) history dates back to the Middle Ages. In the 15th century it was owned by knight Axel Pedersson (Tott). The current manor house was built in 1730 and around 1850 it was a residence for mistress of Fredrik VII of Denmark. There is also a small manor church (1713) which is a popular wedding church.
Founded: 1730 | Location: Mörrum, Sweden

Skinnskatteberg Manor

The building of the manor house was begun in the 1770s by the iron master Wilhelm Hising. During the decades when the planning and building were in progress the outcome had been influenced by many styles and movements in art and architecture. Hising´s son was also christened Wilhelm but was raised to the nobility and given the name Hisinger. He finished, decorated and furnished the Manor House and had a landscape g ...
Founded: 1770s | Location: Skinnskatteberg, Sweden

Forsmark Manor

Forsmark Manor was built between 1767-1774 to the site of the ironworks established in the late 1500s. The Ironworks was burned down by Russians army during the Great Northern War (1719). Samuel af Ugglas bought Forsmark in 1782 and it belonged to his family near two centuries. Today the manor is owned by Forsmark Power Group.
Founded: 1767-1774 | Location: Östhammar, Sweden

Snogeholm Castle

Snogeholm farm dates from the 16th century and it was owned by Thott, Brahe, Marsvin and Bille families. In the 1690s Christian Bille built the new main building between two detached wings. The current castle was built by Erik Claes Piper in 1870. The French Rococo style building has two storeys and three towers. The German Emperor Wilhelm II visited in Snogeholm in 1899 and 1902. Today Snogeholm castle hosts a hotel and ...
Founded: 1870 | Location: Sjöbo, Sweden

Grönsö Castle

Grönsö (or Grönsöö) Castle was built in 1607-1610 by the Privy Council Johan Skytte. The building was constructed of brick and granite in a French style with pitched roof, ridge turrets and four rectangular corner towers. The ground floor can still be seen today with well-preserved interiors and painted ceilings from the 1600s. Family Skytte owned Grönsö throughout the 1600s until it wa ...
Founded: 1607-1610 | Location: Enköping, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Moszna Castle

The Moszna Castle is one of the best known monuments in the western part of Upper Silesia. The history of this building begins in the 17th century, although much older cellars were found in the gardens during excavations carried out at the beginning of the 20th century. Some of the investigators, including H. Barthel, claimed that those cellars could have been remnants of a presumed Templar castle, but their theory has never been proved. After World War II, further excavations discovered a medieval palisade.

The central part of the castle is an old baroque palace which was partially destroyed by fire on the night of April 2, 1896 and was reconstructed in the same year in its original form by Franz Hubert von Tiele-Winckler. The reconstruction works involved an extension of the residence. The eastern Neogothic-styled wing of the building was built by 1900, along with an adjacent orangery. In 1912-1914, the western wing was built in the Neo-Renaissance style. The architectural form of the castle contains a wide variety of styles, thus it can be generally defined as eclectic.

The height of the building, as well as its numerous turrets and spires, give the impression of verticalism. The whole castle has exactly ninety-nine turrets. Inside, it contains 365 rooms. The castle was twice visited by the German Emperor Wilhelm II. His participation in hunting during his stay at the castle was documented in a hand-written chronicle in 1911 as well as in the following year. The castle in Moszna was the residence of a Silesian family Tiele-Winckler who were industrial magnates, from 1866 until the spring of 1945 when they were forced to move to Germany and the castle was occupied by the Red Army. The period of the Soviet control caused significant damage to the castle's internal fittings in comparison to the minor damage caused by WWII.

After World War II the castle did not have a permanent owner and was the home of various institutions until 1972 when it became a convalescent home. Later it became a Public Health Care Centre for Therapies of Neuroses. Nowadays it can be visited by tourists since the health institution has moved to another building in the neighbourhood. The castle also has a chapel which is used as a concert hall. Since 1998 the castle housed a gallery in which works of various artists are presented at regular exhibitions.

Apart from the castle itself, the entire complex includes a park which has no precise boundaries and includes nearby fields, meadows and a forest. Only the main axis of the park can be characterised as geometrical. Starting from the gate, it leads along the oak and then horse-chestnut avenues, towards the castle. Further on, the park passes into an avenue of lime trees with symmetrical canals running along both sides of the path, lined with a few varieties of rhododendrons. The axis of the park terminates at the base of a former monument of Hubert von Tiele-Winckler. On the eastern side of the avenue there is a pond with an islet referred to by the owners as Easter Island. The islet is planted with needle-leaved shrubs and can be reached by a Chinese-styled bridge. The garden, as part of the whole park complex was restored slightly earlier than the castle itself. Preserved documents of 1868 state that the improvement in the garden's aesthetic quality was undertaken by Hubert von Tiele-Winckler.