Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden

Alster Manor

The history of Alster Manor begins from 1397, but the current main building was built in 1772 and reconstructed in 1832. The poet Gustaf Fröding born in Alster in 1860. Today it is a museum.
Founded: 1772 | Location: Karlstad, Sweden

Axel Oxenstierna Palace

Axel Oxenstierna palace in the Old Town of Stockholm was designed by architect Jean de la Vallée to Chancellor Axel Oxenstierna and the construction started in 1653. The palace became the headquarters for the 1668-1680 Swedish Central Bank and after a series of state institutional policy. The palace is uniquely conserved in particular to the exterior. There are state historic building since 1935 and is one of the ...
Founded: 1653 | Location: Stockholm, Sweden

Vannaröd Castle

Vannaröd castle was completed in 1890. It was built by Christian Barnekow, who was married with Scottish Agnes Sofia Montgomery. The architecture of Vannaröd is inspired by the castle in Scotland, where Montgomery was born. Today it is a restaurant.
Founded: 1890 | Location: Sösdala, Sweden

Årsta Castle

The history of Årsta manor date to the 14th century, when it was a residence of Teutonic Order of Livonia. In 1467 it was acquired by Erik Axelsson Tott. The present main building was built by the Claes Hansson Bielkenstierna around the year 1650. After him Årsta has been owned by Kurck, Soop and Fleming families. Today it is owned by Cedergren family and hosts a restaurant.
Founded: ca. 1650 | Location: Haninge, Sweden

Ängelholm Old Town Hall

The lovely old town hall from 1775 in the main square today houses the tourist information. It became too small for the town in 1896.
Founded: 1775 | Location: Ängelholm, Sweden

Övedskloster Castle

In the Middle Ages Övedskloster was a Premonstratensian monastery. In the 16th century Reformation it was moved to Danish Crown. The original castle was destroyed by fire in the beginning of the 17thc century.The current Övedskloster Castle was built in 1765-1776 by Hans Ramel. It was designed by Swedish architect Carl Hårleman. The main building represents the French Rococo style and is built of red sands ...
Founded: 1765-1776 | Location: Sjöbo, Sweden

Svartsjö Palace

The location of Svartsjö Palace (Svartsjö Slott) has housed several royal buildings. During medieval times there was a stone house where prominent Swedish royalty lived. Gustav Vasa and his sons Erik and Johan erected a lavish renaissance palace with a round inner courtyard. It was at least partly designed by Willem Boy and completed in 1580 but burnt down in 1687. The remaining building material was shipped to ...
Founded: 1734-1739 | Location: Svartsjö, Sweden

Stora Hästnäs

Stora Hästnäs is a medieval manor house. The best preserved building is a stone-made warehouse dating back to the 14th century. Today the manor is privately owned.
Founded: 14th century | Location: Visby, Sweden

Ekolsund Castle

The manor of Ekolsund was established in the 1300s. The first known owner was the council Magnus Knutsson, mentioned in 1351. In the 1500s the castle came into royal hands when King Gustav Vasa took over the ownership. It was in 1578-1611 the residence of Princess Sophia of Sweden. The crown anyway donated Ekolsund to Åke Tott in 1618. Ekolsund was moved again to the Crown during Karl XI’s reduction, and in 1 ...
Founded: 17th century | Location: Ekolsund, Sweden

Stora Väsby Manor

The first known owner of Stora Väsby manor was Knut Karlsson (1485-1506). The Kurck noble family sold in to industrialist Emanuel de Geer in 1668. The present manor of Stora Väsby was completed around 1760 based on the design of Carl Hårleman. It is one of the best preserved Rococo-style buildings in Uppland. Next to the castle is a Baroque-style park, which was built in the 1600s. The park was symmetric ...
Founded: 1760 | Location: Upplands Väsby, Sweden

Össjö Castle

The current main building of Össjö Castle was built in 1814 after the previous was destroyed by fire. The two wings, dating from 1766 and 1770s survived from the fire. The Össjö history dates from the 16th century, when it belonged to the powerful Danish Krabbe family. Today it is privately owned and not open to the public.
Founded: 1814 | Location: Ängelholm, Sweden

Tullgarn Palace

Tullgarn Palace is a royal summer palace built in the 1720s. The palace offers a mixture of rococo, Gustavian and Victorian styles. The interior design is regarded as one of Sweden"s finest. In 1719, the old Renaissance castle from the late 16th century was demolished. The newly appointed Privy Councillor Magnus Julius De la Gardie commissioned architect Joseph Gabriel Destain to design the present palace, built in ...
Founded: 1720s | Location: Vagnhärad, Sweden

Jordberga Castle

Jordberga estate was first mentionedin 1355. The original castle was destroyed by fire in 1644 and rebuilt. The current Baroque-style exterior dates from 1906-1908, when the castle was rebuilt according the design of Danish architect Heneri Glaesel. The park is an English-style garden and dates from the mid-19th century. Today castle is owned by Otto von Arnold, member of the Swedish Riksdag.
Founded: 1905-1908 | Location: Klagstorp, Sweden

Charlottenlund Castle

Charlottenlund castle (or manor) lies in the countryside about eight kilometres west of Ystad. The present stately home was built in 1849 and is influenced by the medieval Romanesque style. It is surrounded by beautiful landscaped gardens. It possesses an excellent collection of art from the Nordic world. There is also a fine library. Guided tours are offered to groups by arrangement.
Founded: 1849 | Location: Ystad, Sweden

Steninge Palace

The Baroque-style Steninge Palace was built 1694-1698 to the design of architect Nicodemus Tessin the Younger, the palace is directly inspired by Château de Vaux-le-Vicomte in France, and has a reputation in Sweden as one of the most elegant examples of Baroque mansions. Steninge Palace was completed in 1705. The history of Steninge began in the end of 1200’s when the first known settlement was established. I ...
Founded: 1680-1705 | Location: Märsta, Sweden

Häckeberga Castle

There has been a stronghold in Häckeberga since 1530s. It wa demolished in the 19th century and the current Häckeberga Castle was built in 1873-1875 by Tönnes Wrangel von Brehmer. Helgo Zettervall's architecture represents neo-renaissance style with French details. Today there is an countryside hotel and fine restaurant.
Founded: 1873-1875 | Location: Genarp, Sweden

Orenäs Castle

Örenäs Castle is German Baroque style castle was raised in 1914-1918. It's now a hotel and conference centre with a public restaurant. During WWII Danish and Estonian refugees were hosted here. It's known to be the youngest castle in both Scania and Sweden.
Founded: 1914-1918 | Location: Landskrona, Sweden

Stola Manor

The Ekeblad family owned Stola estate from the 1530"s untill 1879. Several members of the family was noted commanders, royal councillors and country govenors. The building was unoccupied for a greater part of ofthe 19th century, but it has been renovated since and returned to it"s 18th century splendours. Since the end of 1980"s Stola has been owned by a foundation, and part of the groundfloor is used as pr ...
Founded: 19th century | Location: Lidköping, Sweden

Salsta Castle

Salsta Castle is one of the finest Baroque palaces in Uppland. The earliest known settlement in Salsta was a fortified farm from the early Middle Ages and the first known owner was Magnus Greg Ersson in the 1300s. The family of Bielke became the owner of Salsta in the 1500s and they erected a three-storey Renaissance castle. The present castle with park was built in 1672-78 by Nils Bielke and the building master was Mathi ...
Founded: 1672-1678 | Location: Vattholma, Sweden

Råda Manor

Råda Manor was built in 1772 according the design of William Chambers. It consists of main building and two annexes. Two red-painted warehouses date probably from the 17th century. Today Råda has a restaurant, wine cellar and it offers conference and wedding services.
Founded: 1772 | Location: Mölnlycke, Sweden

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Beersel Castle

The moated castle at Beersel is one of the few exceptionally well-preserved examples of medieval fortifications in Belgium. It remains pretty much as it must have appeared in the 15th century. Remarkably, it was never converted into a fortified mansion. A visitor is able to experience at first-hand how it must have felt to live in a heavily fortified castle in the Middle Ages.

The castle was built in around 1420 as a means of defence on the outer reaches of Brussels. The tall, dense walls and towers were intended to hold any besiegers at bay. The moat and the marshy ground along its eastern, southern and western edges made any attack a formidable proposition. For that reason, any attackers would have chosen its weaker northern defences where the castle adjoins higher lying ground. But the castle was only taken and destroyed on one occasion in 1489, by the inhabitants of Brussels who were in rebellion against Maximilian of Austria.

After being stormed and plundered by the rebels it was partially rebuilt. The pointed roofs and stepped gables are features which have survived this period. The reconstruction explains why two periods can be identified in the fabric of the edifice, particularly on the outside.

The red Brabant sandstone surrounds of the embrasures, now more or less all bricked up, are characteristic of the 15th century. The other embrasures, edged with white sandstone, date from the end of the 15th century. They were intended for setting up the artillery fire. The merlons too are in white sandstone. The year 1617 can be clearly seen in the foundation support on the first tower. This refers to restorations carried out at the time by the Arenberg family.

Nowadays, the castle is dominated by three massive towers. The means of defence follow the classic pattern: a wide, deep moat surrounding the castle, a drawbridge, merlons on the towers, embrasures in the walls and in the towers, at more or less regular intervals, and machiolations. Circular, projecting towers ensured that attacks from the side could be thwarted. If the enemy were to penetrate the outer wall, each tower could be defended from embrasures facing onto the inner courtyard.

The second and third towers are flanked by watchtowers from which shots could be fired directly below. Between the second and third tower are two openings in the walkway on the wall. It is not clear what these were used for. Were these holes used for the disposing of rubbish, or escape routes. The windows on the exterior are narrow and low. All light entering comes from the interior. The few larger windows on the exterior date from a later period. It is most probable that the third tower - the highest - was used as a watchtower.