Salsta Castle is one of the finest Baroque palaces in Uppland. The earliest known settlement in Salsta was a fortified farm from the early Middle Ages and the first known owner was Magnus Greg Ersson in the 1300s. The family of Bielke became the owner of Salsta in the 1500s and they erected a three-storey Renaissance castle. The present castle with park was built in 1672-78 by Nils Bielke and the building master was Mathias Spihler. The castle was strongly inspired of French Baroque style. The model of Salsta, as well as many palaces, was taken from Vaux-le-Vicomte, a chateau near Paris.

Also the garden was a French-inspired. Nils Bielke had visited in the Versailles park, knowing that a baroque garden should be symmetric and strictly. There are today only some remains of the original Baroque park, but you can sense the romantic park with winding paths and pedestrian bridges that were built in the 1800s.

An extensive renovation was made at the end of the 1700s. Main floor was reconstructed with new furnishings and modern stoves. The owner of Salsta was then Fredrik Magnus Brahe, who also owned Rydboholm and Skokloster castles. Until 1976 Salsta was a residence of the family von Essen. Since 1996, Salsta is managed by the National Property Board.

Salsta castle became a national monument in 1993 due the well-preserved appearance and the site's long history.

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Details

Founded: 1672-1678
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Elon Kinberger (12 months ago)
Spook
Lajos J. Hajdu (14 months ago)
Fine old castle, it is closed most of the time except events.
Алена Вишина (3 years ago)
I liked the castle itself, it looked pretty cool, surrounded by autumn trees, the nature around is beautiful. However when I was there everything was closed, even the gates you go through to get near it. So not much to do, just walked a circle around the castle and headed back.
Håkan Karlsten (3 years ago)
Fantastiskt fin ställe med en otroligt duktig guide som berättar inlevelsefullt om historien kring slottet och dess ägare.
Johan Söderström (3 years ago)
Trevlig park, trevligt att promenera omkring... Finns dock inget kafé eller liknande om ni vill fika...
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