Highland Park Distillery

Orkney, United Kingdom

Highland Park distillery is the most northerly whisky distillery in Scotland, half a mile farther north than that at Scapa distillery. The distillery was founded in 1798, presumably by Magnus Eunson. The name of this whisky does not refer to the area of Scotland known as The Highlands, but rather to the fact that the distillery was founded on an area called 'High Park' distinguished from a lower area nearby.

Highland Park is one of the few distilleries to malt its own barley, using locally cut peat from Hobbister Moor. The peat is then mixed with heather before being used as fuel. The malt is peated to a level of 20 parts per million phenol and then mixed with unpeated malt produced on the Scottish mainland.

In 1984, Highland Park was the only whisky ever to have scored a rating of 100% by the regular tasting team of The Scotsman, a national newspaper of Scotland.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

A961, Orkney, United Kingdom
See all sites in Orkney

Details

Founded: 1798
Category:

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

michgellie (2 years ago)
Excellent. We arrived last summer with 13yr old but couldnt do tour. Came back in october a day after his 14th birthday and did the Viking Soul tour. Amazing to see the old and new kilns and the malt floor. Great tour guide who was funny and very clued up and witty. Drams were great too. All in all very good.
Peter Bickerstaffe (2 years ago)
Wonderful guided tour from a very pleasant and knowledgeable young lady. I'm new to Whisky and learnt to appreciate Highland Park whisky even more. Thank you.
Martin Kupka (2 years ago)
Great distillery tour with Viking heritage (great shout out to our tour guide Charlie - she was the absolute best). Highly recommended. If you drive ask for the driver's kit for 4£ in advance.
David Berg (2 years ago)
Great tour - visitor friendly layout and the right amount of info on the distillation process to satisfy the casual Scotch whisky fan. Tour guide Charlie was great!!
Michelle A (2 years ago)
Good tour but it was the 'silent' season so no moving or working parts. A lot of people going through and lucky to get a spot due to a cancellation. Good to see a traditional distillery.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Derbent Fortress

Derbent is the southernmost city in Russia, occupying the narrow gateway between the Caspian Sea and the Caucasus Mountains connecting the Eurasian steppes to the north and the Iranian Plateau to the south. Derbent claims to be the oldest city in Russia with historical documentation dating to the 8th century BCE. Due to its strategic location, over the course of history, the city changed ownership many times, particularly among the Persian, Arab, Mongol, Timurid, Shirvan and Iranian kingdoms.

Derbent has archaeological structures over 5,000 years old. As a result of this geographic peculiarity, the city developed between two walls, stretching from the mountains to the sea. These fortifications were continuously employed for a millennium and a half, longer than any other extant fortress in the world.

A traditionally and historically Iranian city, the first intensive settlement in the Derbent area dates from the 8th century BC. The site was intermittently controlled by the Persian monarchs, starting from the 6th century BC. Until the 4th century AD, it was part of Caucasian Albania which was a satrap of the Achaemenid Persian Empire. In the 5th century Derbent functioned as a border fortress and the seat of Sassanid Persians. Because of its strategic position on the northern branch of the Silk Route, the fortress was contested by the Khazars in the course of the Khazar-Arab Wars. In 654, Derbent was captured by the Arabs.

The Sassanid fortress does not exist any more, as the famous Derbent fortress as it stands today was built from the 12th century onward. Derbent became a strong military outpost and harbour of the Sassanid empire. During the 5th and 6th centuries, Derbent also became an important center for spreading the Christian faith in the Caucasus.

The site continued to be of great strategic importance until the 19th century. Today the fortifications consist of two parallel defence walls and Naryn-Kala Citadel. The walls are 3.6km long, stretching from the sea up to the mountains. They were built from stone and had 73 defence towers. 9 out of the 14 original gates remain.

In Naryn-Kala Citadel most of the old buildings, including a palace and a church, are now in ruins. It also holds baths and one of the oldest mosques in the former USSR.

In 2003, UNESCO included the old part of Derbent with traditional buildings in the World Heritage List.