Samobor Castle was built on a hill above the crossroads of then important routes in the northwestern corner of the Sava valley, above the medieval market town of Samobor. The castle was erected by the supporters of Czech king, Ottokar II of Bohemia, between 1260 and 1264, who was then in a war with Hungarian king Stephen V. Croatian-Hungarian forces under command of duke of Okić soon retook the castle, for which he was granted the city of Samobor, as well as the privilege to collect local taxes.

The fortification was originally a stone fortress built on solid rock - in an irregular and indented layout, which consists of three parts, out of which the central core represents the oldest part of the castle. In the southeastern part of the core there was a high guard tower (nowadays in ruins), which is the only remaining original part of Ottokar castle. Just next to the guard tower lies a semicircular tower with a small gothic chapel of St. Ana which is estimated to be built in third decade of the 16th century.

In the third decade of the 16th century, reshaping of a castle begint which was done by a gradual expansion of the core towards the north. The fortification thus became an elongated trapezoidal courtyard surrounded by a strong defensive wall and with a pentagonal tower on its ends. Throughout 17th and 18th century, the castle was upgraded and reconstructed. The last building inside the fortress was a three-storey house on its southern side, which along with castle's upper parts forms a courtyard. Its facades are divided by Tuscan columned porches, and its interior is rich with the equipment. This move transformed a castle from its original fortificational function into a countryside baroque styled castle. Last residents left the castle in the end of the 18th century, which triggered the gradual castle's decadence into a shape that it is today.

Nowadays, Samobor Castle is just a picturesque ruin above Vugrinščak creek in Samobor city centre. Even though a project of castle restoration exists, only the chapel walls were renovated so far. In its restoration, the stones of the ruined castle parts, cement and slaked lime were used.

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Founded: 1260
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

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User Reviews

Jorge Higginson (6 months ago)
The entrance is free, it's a small abandoned citadel. It's worth visiting and looks very magical. Everything is destroyed and the nature is taking over a little, looks like a Zelda scenario
Alex Oleksenko (6 months ago)
The ruins of old castle of Samobor. It doesn’t make sense to schedule a lot of time for that place but the walk to the castle is highly recommended. The nature around is amazing and the view from the top is very beautiful.
Dan Smith (10 months ago)
Fun exploring and imagining what was there before. Easy hike with great views
Ashkan Sadri (14 months ago)
This is one of my favourite places near Zagreb. The ruins are beautiful and intricate. It's best to go right after a rain fall because chances are you'll have the whole place to yourself!
gavin Paterson (18 months ago)
If you are into history and old castles then go and visit. It is a rugged and interesting place for a visit. then walk to Samobor town and enjoy a Kremshnite!
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