Samobor Castle was built on a hill above the crossroads of then important routes in the northwestern corner of the Sava valley, above the medieval market town of Samobor. The castle was erected by the supporters of Czech king, Ottokar II of Bohemia, between 1260 and 1264, who was then in a war with Hungarian king Stephen V. Croatian-Hungarian forces under command of duke of Okić soon retook the castle, for which he was granted the city of Samobor, as well as the privilege to collect local taxes.

The fortification was originally a stone fortress built on solid rock - in an irregular and indented layout, which consists of three parts, out of which the central core represents the oldest part of the castle. In the southeastern part of the core there was a high guard tower (nowadays in ruins), which is the only remaining original part of Ottokar castle. Just next to the guard tower lies a semicircular tower with a small gothic chapel of St. Ana which is estimated to be built in third decade of the 16th century.

In the third decade of the 16th century, reshaping of a castle begint which was done by a gradual expansion of the core towards the north. The fortification thus became an elongated trapezoidal courtyard surrounded by a strong defensive wall and with a pentagonal tower on its ends. Throughout 17th and 18th century, the castle was upgraded and reconstructed. The last building inside the fortress was a three-storey house on its southern side, which along with castle's upper parts forms a courtyard. Its facades are divided by Tuscan columned porches, and its interior is rich with the equipment. This move transformed a castle from its original fortificational function into a countryside baroque styled castle. Last residents left the castle in the end of the 18th century, which triggered the gradual castle's decadence into a shape that it is today.

Nowadays, Samobor Castle is just a picturesque ruin above Vugrinščak creek in Samobor city centre. Even though a project of castle restoration exists, only the chapel walls were renovated so far. In its restoration, the stones of the ruined castle parts, cement and slaked lime were used.

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Founded: 1260
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

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User Reviews

msiersciuch (2 years ago)
Nice castle
Scott Kennedy (2 years ago)
Amazing castle with great views. The hike up took some energy. There are easy trails and hard trails.
Brad Couper (2 years ago)
Fantastic old ruined town and castle. Very safe to wander around, no entrance fee. We walked up via a very narrow steep section just behind St George's Church, that way you get to see the cute church. But if you don't like the very steep sections, turn up the main path. Simply follow the creek path towards the castle, then when the footpath forks off (there is a sign at the fork talking about a swimming pool) take the left fork and head up the dirt path. It is a lovely walk by the creek, and the hike up the hill is short and shady (you will need good shoes). There are no shops or toilets up there. It was super quiet when we did it on Wednesday morning about 10am, we only saw 2 other people at the castle.
Tomislav Hren (2 years ago)
Beautiful old ruin of a castle. Interesting history behind it. It's a 15min walk from the center of Samobor. Just follow the creek. There's a minor steep part but it's not that hard. All in all, great to see.
Luka Filipović (2 years ago)
Quite a nice place to explore in an hour total. Despite it being a ruin it holds up pretty well with no apparent dangers. The hike is short but shaded with a fresh n' natural water source half of the way up. The nature in and around it, although very nice to look at, unfortunately blocks the view towards the town of Samobor with only one spot (near the entrance) managing to reveal about half of it. Other than that I'd recommend it, especially in later afternoons when it's warm/chilly.
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