Aqueduct of Diocletian

Split, Croatia

The Aqueduct of Diocletian is an ancient Roman aqueduct near Split, constructed during the Roman Empire to supply water to the palace of the emperor Diocletian. The Aqueduct of Diocletian was constructed between the end of 3rd and beginning of the 4th century AD, at the same time as the palace.

The aqueduct took water from the river Jadro, 9 kilometres northeast of Diocletian's Palace, today Split's city centre, and brought water to the Palace over a height difference of 13 m. Another aqueduct took water from the same source to Salona.

The aqueduct was destroyed in the invasion of Goths in the middle of 6th century and did not work for thirteen centuries after that.

The first reconstruction of the aqueduct took place during the reign of the Austro-Hungarian Empire (1877–1880). The Diocletianic aqueduct was abandoned in 1932, when the modern water station was built in Kopilica, a peripheral area of Split. The best-preserved part of the aqueduct near Dujmovača (Solin) has a maximum height of 16.5 m and a length of 180 m.

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Details

Founded: 4th century AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stas Bidenko (9 months ago)
Nice view but it would be better to have an observation desk.
Daniel Adamic (9 months ago)
Stands somewhat lost in the landscape. It's okay for a few photos. There is nothing more here.
pts pts (2 years ago)
Very good pictures from 1 area only. You can climb on top and walk around it for a short way.
pts pts (2 years ago)
Very good pictures from 1 area only. You can climb on top and walk around it for a short way.
Steve Fletcher (2 years ago)
Again great to see things like this and you can even walk up and walk where water once flowed
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