Walls of Ston

Ston, Croatia

The Walls of Ston are a series of defensive stone walls, originally more than 7 kilometres long, that surrounded and protected the city of Ston. Their construction was begun in 1358. Today, it is one of the longest preserved fotification systems in the world.

Despite being well protected by massive city walls, the Republic of Ragusa used Pelješac to build another line of defence. At its narrowest point, just before it joins the mainland, a wall was built from Ston to Mali Ston. Throughout the era of the Republic, the walls were maintained and renovated once they meant to protect the precious salt pans that contributed to Dubrovnik's wealth, which are still being worked today.

Demolition work began on the walls following the fall of the Republic. Later the Austrian authorities took materials away from the wall to build schools and community buildings, and also for a triumphal arch on the occasion of the visit by the Austrian Emperor in 1884. The wall around Mali Ston was demolished with the excuse that it was damaging the health of the people. The demolition was halted after World War II.

Layout

The wall, today 5.5 kilometres long, links Ston to Mali Ston, and is in the shape of an irregular pentangle. It was completed in the 15th century, along with its 40 towers (20 of which have survived) and 5 fortresses. Within, three streets were laid from north to south and three others from east to west. Thus, fifteen equal blocks were formed with 10 houses in each. Residential buildings around the edges. The Gothic Republic Chancellery and the Bishop's Palace are outstanding among the public buildings.

The main streets are 6 m wide (except the southern street which is 8 m wide) and the side streets are two m wide. The town was entered by two city gates: the Field Gate (Poljska vrata) has a Latin inscription and dates from 1506. The centres of the system are the fortress Veliki kaštio in Ston, Koruna in Mali Ston and the fortress on Podzvizd hill. Noted artist who work on the walls project are Michelozzo, Bernardino Gatti of Parma and Giorgio da Sebenico (Juraj Dalmatinac).

The city plan of Dubrovnik was used as a model for Ston, but since Ston was built on prepared terrain, that model was more closely followed than Dubrovnik itself.

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Details

Founded: 1358
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ada SzK (6 months ago)
Amazing. At the beginning of September 2020 only medium and small path was available. We did the medium one. The ticket is worth its price.
Artur Ciegotura (6 months ago)
Another unbelievable feat by the people in the early days. These walls are high, long and build on very steep hills. These walls hide a lot of history, how they protected the very valuable salt pans from robbers. Get ready for a long walk, bring some perishables and water because it can get really hot up there. Not to forget walking shoes. On the way down, to the city center, there are plenty of places you can eat some of the best Croatian food. Highly recommended!!!!!!
pts pts (7 months ago)
Simply- 5 star super awesome preserved walls! Absolutely awesome in length and size. You can only stand slackjawed at the manual labor required to build these!!!
Anamarija Bezjak (7 months ago)
Awesome city walls. Need to be well prepared for the walk, wear appropriate shoes and clothes, bring lots of water.
Antonella Jerković (7 months ago)
Beautiful stone walls, amazing view from the top. Remember to bring water and wear snickers :).
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