The rectangular Sponza Palace with an inner courtyard was built in a mixed Gothic and Renaissance style between 1516 and 1522 by Paskoje Miličević Mihov. Its name is derived from the Latin word 'spongia', the spot where rainwater was collected.

The loggia and sculptures were crafted by the brothers Andrijić and other stonecutters.

The palace has served a variety of public functions, including as a customs office and bonded warehouse, mint, armoury, treasury, bank and school. It became the cultural center of the Republic of Ragusa with the establishment of the Academia dei Concordi, a literary academy, in the 16th century. It survived the 1667 earthquake without damage. The palace's atrium served as a trading center and business meeting place.

The palace is now home to the city archives, which hold documents dating back to the 12th century, with the earliest manuscript being from 1022. These files, including more than 7000 volumes of manuscripts and about 100,000 individual manuscripts, were previously kept in the Rector's palace.

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Founded: 1516-1522
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Croatia

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

lucian oana (10 months ago)
The admittance price is a real rippof. It's 25 Kuna and they don't even let you go upstairs
Philippe V (10 months ago)
Beautiful from outside, but do not pay the 25 kunas for seeing the inside, which has almost no interest. Except if you want to see some ridiculous so-called modern art paintings, as well as the interior patio, which is nice, and hidden from the outside with a panel they have installed as you would otherwise have no reason to pay.
Robert Zobel (10 months ago)
Such an elegance...
Bekir Hadziomerović (11 months ago)
A small section dedicated to the history of Orlando and his column outside the palace. In many ways it felt lacking.
Jérôme Le Champion (11 months ago)
25 kun for juste 1 room.. very bad museum
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