One of the most significant monuments of profane architecture on the Croatian coast is the Rector's Palace, former administrative centre of the Dubrovnik Republic. Its style is basically Gothic, with the Renaissance and Baroque reconstructions. In the 15th century the Palace was destroyed twice in gunpowder explosions. Restored by Onofrio della Cava in the late Gothic style after the first explosion in 1435, the Palace got its present-day size with the central atrium and front portico. The capitals were carved in Renaissance style by Pietro di Martino of Milan, whose capital with Aesculapius has been preserved on the right half-column of the portico.

The second gunpowder explosion in 1463 destroyed the western facade of the Palace, and the two famous architects Juraj Dalmatinac and Michelozzo of Florence were engaged in the reconstruction for a short period.Although the design of Michelozzo was unfortunately rejected, his influence in the restoration of the facade and portico, mainly in Renaissance style, can not be denied. After the earthquake of 1667 the atrium was partially reconstructed with an impressive Baroque staircase.

During his one-month mandate the Rector of Dubrovnik lived in the Palace, which also housed the Minor and Major Council hall, the Rectors residence, the courtroom, administration office, prisons, an arsenal and gunpowder store-house. From the Rectors Palace one could enter the Great Council Palace.

Today the Rectors Palace houses the Cultural-historic Department of the Dubrovnik Museum with exhibition halls arranged to display the original setting with antique furniture and objects for daily use, as well as paintings by local and Italian masters.

The Museum also guards a collection of old coins used in the Dubrovnik Republic, a collection of arms and utensils of Domus Christi Pharmacy from the 15th century. Apart from being exceptionally beautiful, the Rectors Palace Atrium has excellent acoustics, and is often used as a concert venue.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Croatia

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sharad Singh (13 months ago)
Great place to see the artitecture, some chests and the place where Rector used to live. There is also a museum inside of it which is amazing to see. If you buy the city pass it comes included in it.
Niko Leon Zgalin (14 months ago)
Very historical and good place, you must see!
Leanne Bing (14 months ago)
Liked the treasure chests the most. Get the dubrovnik pass and it's included.
Trina Chia (14 months ago)
Nice interior but only worth it if entry is based on dubrovnik card. One of the Game of thrones Qarth scenes were filmed here though so that's pretty cool
Brady Santoro (2 years ago)
Beautiful architectural testament to the former Republic of Dubrovnik, with an interesting museum about the history of the city. Is sadly more famous for a staircase used in Game of Thrones than the actual museum and building, as there are some interesting prison cells in the grand hall that are open on display, and pictures from the Yugoslav Wars, where Dubrovnik was under Yugoslavian siege, and significant parts of the Old City nearly destroyed from the fires and bombardment, including parts of the Rector's Palace. Is certainly a good stop in Dubrovnik, not any random Game of Throne souvenir shop.
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