Dubrovnik Synagogue

Dubrovnik, Croatia

The Old Synagogue in Dubrovnik is the oldest Sefardic synagogue still in use today in the world and the second oldest synagogue in Europe. It is said to have been established in 1352, but gained legal status in the city in 1408. Owned by the local Jewish community, the main floor still functions as a place of worship for Holy days and special occasions, but is now mainly a city museum which hosts numerous Jewish ritual items and centuries-old artifacts.

Located in one of the many tiny streets of the Old Town of Dubrovnik, it is connected to a neighboring building which has long been owned by the Tolentino family, who have been caretakers of the synagogue for centuries. The internal layout is different from other European synagogues and has gone numerous refurbishments throughout the centuries, and has a mixture of designs from different eras. The building has sustained damage several times, with the great earthquake in 1667, World War II, and the Croatian War of Independence in the 1990s. The damage has since been repaired as closely as possible to its original design.

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Details

Founded: 1352-1408
Category: Religious sites in Croatia

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Shaun May (7 months ago)
Fascinating and well worth the entrance fee
Ronald Blom (9 months ago)
beautiful preserved very old synagoge. Small entrance fee.
Desde Abajo Oficial (9 months ago)
Nice experience in the sinagoge, thanks for the helpness and the information about one of the most antiques sinagoge
Belov (11 months ago)
Amazing Jewish experience! Must visit & donate. Lets keep our history alive. Thanks to people of Dubrovnik
Ivo Topencharov (5 years ago)
Great view to the city from the entrance of the place. Gorgeous paintings.
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