Dubrovnik Synagogue

Dubrovnik, Croatia

The Old Synagogue in Dubrovnik is the oldest Sefardic synagogue still in use today in the world and the second oldest synagogue in Europe. It is said to have been established in 1352, but gained legal status in the city in 1408. Owned by the local Jewish community, the main floor still functions as a place of worship for Holy days and special occasions, but is now mainly a city museum which hosts numerous Jewish ritual items and centuries-old artifacts.

Located in one of the many tiny streets of the Old Town of Dubrovnik, it is connected to a neighboring building which has long been owned by the Tolentino family, who have been caretakers of the synagogue for centuries. The internal layout is different from other European synagogues and has gone numerous refurbishments throughout the centuries, and has a mixture of designs from different eras. The building has sustained damage several times, with the great earthquake in 1667, World War II, and the Croatian War of Independence in the 1990s. The damage has since been repaired as closely as possible to its original design.

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Founded: 1352-1408
Category: Religious sites in Croatia

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ivo Topencharov (3 years ago)
Great view to the city from the entrance of the place. Gorgeous paintings.
Paul Pavlovic (3 years ago)
Not sure who am I to grade places of worship but if you ask me it’s a beautiful peaceful reflecting place, peace !!!
Gyorgy Valyi (3 years ago)
Very small but beautiful baroque synagogue in an amazing town of Dubrovnik. The local Jewish community used to number less than two dozen members, all murdered by the nazis in Holocaust. Remember! #synagogue
Lukas Goldschmidt (3 years ago)
Great exhibition, very friendly and helpful staff, tons of information and of course a synagogue with an unspeakable vibration...
Brady Santoro (4 years ago)
Beautiful old synagogue, a testament to the Jews of Dubrovnik. There is a museum as well in it, about the Jews of Dubrovnik, with many important documents and records. The sanctuary itself is very plain, with a lovely carved bimah, in an interesting pseudo-Sephardi fashion. There is an entrance fee, but it goes to support the dwindling Jewish community in Dubrovnik.
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