Old City of Dubrovnik

Dubrovnik, Croatia

Dubrovnik is one of the most prominent tourist destinations in the Mediterranean Sea, today listed as UNESCO World Heritage Site. The prosperity of the city was historically based on maritime trade; as the capital of the maritime Republic of Ragusa, it achieved a high level of development, particularly during the 15th and 16th centuries, as it became notable for its wealth and skilled diplomacy.

The 'Pearl of the Adriatic' became an important Mediterranean sea power from the 13th century onwards. Although severely damaged by an earthquake in 1667, Dubrovnik managed to preserve its beautiful Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque churches, monasteries, palaces and fountains.

A feature of Dubrovnik is its walls that run almost 2 kilometres around the city. The walls are 4 to 6 metres thick on the landward side but are much thinner on the seaward side. The system of turrets and towers were intended to protect the vulnerable city. The walls of Dubrovnik have also been a popular filming location for the fictional city of King's Landing in the HBO television series, Game of Thrones.

Few of Dubrovnik's Renaissance buildings survived the earthquake of 1667 but fortunately enough remained to give an idea of the city's architectural heritage. The finest Renaissance highlight is the Sponza Palace which dates from the 16th century and is currently used to house the National Archives.

Dubrovnik's most beloved church is St Blaise's church, built in the 18th century in honour of Dubrovnik's patron saint. Dubrovnik's Baroque Cathedral was built in the 18th century and houses an impressive Treasury with relics of Saint Blaise. The city's Dominican Monastery resembles a fortress on the outside but the interior contains an art museum and a Gothic-Romanesque church.

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Details

Founded: 7th century
Category: Historic city squares, old towns and villages in Croatia

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Srisuda Chariyakul (2 years ago)
This place is a small local market which sale vetgetables, fruits,and meat. Some are souvenir shops.
Robert Freeman (3 years ago)
It's an interesting but small market, mainly serving tourists but also with local produce.
Justin Allen (3 years ago)
Pretty cool historic area with lots to take in and appreciate. Plenty of photo opportunities for tourists, as you'd expect though lots and lots of people.
prashant kasbe (3 years ago)
Very beautiful and scenic, it's August it can be very humid and hot at 10 in morning also.
daeyoung jung (3 years ago)
Amazing ice creams. Try Raffaello premium. Please. If you are feeling adventurous go for dark chocolate as it leaves black marks all over your mouth and lips haha Great places for dining out, but also packing out food from pizza or burger places, and taking them to the area near light house to eat there watching the ocean. Buying beer from grocery stores is 1/3rd price of restaurants.
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Mosque–Cathedral of Córdoba

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According to a traditional account, a small Visigoth church, the Catholic Basilica of Saint Vincent of Lérins, originally stood on the site. In 784 Abd al-Rahman I ordered construction of the Great Mosque, which was considerably expanded by later Muslim rulers. The mosque underwent numerous subsequent changes: Abd al-Rahman II ordered a new minaret, while in 961 Al-Hakam II enlarged the building and enriched the Mihrab. The last of such reforms was carried out by Almanzor in 987. It was connected to the Caliph"s palace by a raised walkway, mosques within the palaces being the tradition for previous Islamic rulers – as well as Christian Kings who built their palaces adjacent to churches. The Mezquita reached its current dimensions in 987 with the completion of the outer naves and courtyard.

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