Old City of Dubrovnik

Dubrovnik, Croatia

Dubrovnik is one of the most prominent tourist destinations in the Mediterranean Sea, today listed as UNESCO World Heritage Site. The prosperity of the city was historically based on maritime trade; as the capital of the maritime Republic of Ragusa, it achieved a high level of development, particularly during the 15th and 16th centuries, as it became notable for its wealth and skilled diplomacy.

The 'Pearl of the Adriatic' became an important Mediterranean sea power from the 13th century onwards. Although severely damaged by an earthquake in 1667, Dubrovnik managed to preserve its beautiful Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque churches, monasteries, palaces and fountains.

A feature of Dubrovnik is its walls that run almost 2 kilometres around the city. The walls are 4 to 6 metres thick on the landward side but are much thinner on the seaward side. The system of turrets and towers were intended to protect the vulnerable city. The walls of Dubrovnik have also been a popular filming location for the fictional city of King's Landing in the HBO television series, Game of Thrones.

Few of Dubrovnik's Renaissance buildings survived the earthquake of 1667 but fortunately enough remained to give an idea of the city's architectural heritage. The finest Renaissance highlight is the Sponza Palace which dates from the 16th century and is currently used to house the National Archives.

Dubrovnik's most beloved church is St Blaise's church, built in the 18th century in honour of Dubrovnik's patron saint. Dubrovnik's Baroque Cathedral was built in the 18th century and houses an impressive Treasury with relics of Saint Blaise. The city's Dominican Monastery resembles a fortress on the outside but the interior contains an art museum and a Gothic-Romanesque church.

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Details

Founded: 7th century
Category: Historic city squares, old towns and villages in Croatia

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Srisuda Chariyakul (13 months ago)
This place is a small local market which sale vetgetables, fruits,and meat. Some are souvenir shops.
Robert Freeman (2 years ago)
It's an interesting but small market, mainly serving tourists but also with local produce.
Justin Allen (2 years ago)
Pretty cool historic area with lots to take in and appreciate. Plenty of photo opportunities for tourists, as you'd expect though lots and lots of people.
prashant kasbe (2 years ago)
Very beautiful and scenic, it's August it can be very humid and hot at 10 in morning also.
daeyoung jung (2 years ago)
Amazing ice creams. Try Raffaello premium. Please. If you are feeling adventurous go for dark chocolate as it leaves black marks all over your mouth and lips haha Great places for dining out, but also packing out food from pizza or burger places, and taking them to the area near light house to eat there watching the ocean. Buying beer from grocery stores is 1/3rd price of restaurants.
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Kalozha Church

The Kalozha church of Saints Boris and Gleb is the oldest extant structure in Hrodna. It is the only surviving monument of ancient Black Ruthenian architecture, distinguished from other Orthodox churches by prolific use of polychrome faceted stones of blue, green or red tint which could be arranged to form crosses or other figures on the wall.

The church is a cross-domed building supported by six circular pillars. The outside is articulated with projecting pilasters, which have rounded corners, as does the building itself. The ante-nave contains the choir loft, accessed by a narrow gradatory in the western wall. Two other stairs were discovered in the walls of the side apses; their purpose is not clear. The floor is lined with ceramic tiles forming decorative patterns. The interior was lined with innumerable built-in pitchers, which usually serve in Eastern Orthodox churches as resonators but in this case were scored to produce decorative effects. For this reason, the central nave has never been painted.

The church was built before 1183 and survived intact, depicted in the 1840s by Michał Kulesza, until 1853, when the south wall collapsed, due to its perilous location on the high bank of the Neman. During restoration works, some fragments of 12th-century frescoes were discovered in the apses. Remains of four other churches in the same style, decorated with pitchers and coloured stones instead of frescoes, were discovered in Hrodna and Vaŭkavysk. They all date back to the turn of the 13th century, as do remains of the first stone palace in the Old Hrodna Castle.

In 2004, the church was included in the Tentative List of UNESCO"s World Heritage Sites.