Old City of Dubrovnik

Dubrovnik, Croatia

Dubrovnik is one of the most prominent tourist destinations in the Mediterranean Sea, today listed as UNESCO World Heritage Site. The prosperity of the city was historically based on maritime trade; as the capital of the maritime Republic of Ragusa, it achieved a high level of development, particularly during the 15th and 16th centuries, as it became notable for its wealth and skilled diplomacy.

The 'Pearl of the Adriatic' became an important Mediterranean sea power from the 13th century onwards. Although severely damaged by an earthquake in 1667, Dubrovnik managed to preserve its beautiful Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque churches, monasteries, palaces and fountains.

A feature of Dubrovnik is its walls that run almost 2 kilometres around the city. The walls are 4 to 6 metres thick on the landward side but are much thinner on the seaward side. The system of turrets and towers were intended to protect the vulnerable city. The walls of Dubrovnik have also been a popular filming location for the fictional city of King's Landing in the HBO television series, Game of Thrones.

Few of Dubrovnik's Renaissance buildings survived the earthquake of 1667 but fortunately enough remained to give an idea of the city's architectural heritage. The finest Renaissance highlight is the Sponza Palace which dates from the 16th century and is currently used to house the National Archives.

Dubrovnik's most beloved church is St Blaise's church, built in the 18th century in honour of Dubrovnik's patron saint. Dubrovnik's Baroque Cathedral was built in the 18th century and houses an impressive Treasury with relics of Saint Blaise. The city's Dominican Monastery resembles a fortress on the outside but the interior contains an art museum and a Gothic-Romanesque church.

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Details

Founded: 7th century
Category: Historic city squares, old towns and villages in Croatia

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vivian Kassapakis (3 years ago)
Game of Thrones fan or not this place is amazing from the minute you meet at Pile Gate to the moment you explore every nook and cranny What can I say. A city steep in history yet intact and restored to a former glory. From the City walls to its beaches, from the shops to the amazing restaurants this place has it all A place that’s for young and old. I stayed within the city walls and would recommend this for anyone wanting to experience the city up close and personal The weather is perfect during the summer months so don’t hesitate to add Old Town Dubrovnik to your list of must see places!!
Jared Tyrrell (3 years ago)
Fruit and veg seems fresh, but overall has very little to offer. Prices also seem relatively high
Georgia May (3 years ago)
It was nice to wander round the market and browse traditional Croatian produce. There are a range of vendors which sell lavender, soaps, Croatian sweets, fruit and more.
Humphrey Harrow (3 years ago)
Honestly, I wouldn’t bother if you are a foodie and love going to markets. Very touristy which can’t be helped. It is so small with very little to offer. From one stall to another, there was little variety. Lavender, crystallised fruit peels,and fruits.
Srisuda Chariyakul (3 years ago)
This place is a small local market which sale vetgetables, fruits,and meat. Some are souvenir shops.
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