The Fort Bokar, often called Zvjezdan, is considered to be amongst the most beautiful instances of harmonious and functional fortification architecture. Built as a two-story casemate fortress by Michelozzo from 1461 to 1463, while the city walls were being reconstructed, it stands in front of the medieval wall face protruding into space almost with its whole cylindrical volume. It was conceived as the key point in the defense of the Pila Gate, the western fortified entrance of the city; and after the Minčeta Tower, it is the second key point in the defense of the western land approach to the city.

Bokar is said to be the oldest casemented fortress in Europe, which contains a small lapidary collection and numerous cannons.

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Founded: 1461-1463
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

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User Reviews

Rajko Keravica (2 years ago)
Really nice looking fort. The best view of it will be from pile plato. Also you can go down to pile harbour, nice view there as well!
Tork Mackenzie (2 years ago)
The Bokar fort is an impressive and impreganable tower on the city walls which look really impresive from the St Lawrence fortress
Urban Traveler (3 years ago)
One of the towers, looking at the sea, accesible from the walls tour.
Craig Rose (3 years ago)
Beautiful spot in Old Town. The views are breathtaking. Go early before the cruise ship people get there.
Al Miller (3 years ago)
Wall walk a MUST. Go early, very hot, avoid busy cruise ship days. Couple great refreshment/view points on ocean side. ( 150 Kn. p/p )
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