The Fort Bokar, often called Zvjezdan, is considered to be amongst the most beautiful instances of harmonious and functional fortification architecture. Built as a two-story casemate fortress by Michelozzo from 1461 to 1463, while the city walls were being reconstructed, it stands in front of the medieval wall face protruding into space almost with its whole cylindrical volume. It was conceived as the key point in the defense of the Pila Gate, the western fortified entrance of the city; and after the Minčeta Tower, it is the second key point in the defense of the western land approach to the city.

Bokar is said to be the oldest casemented fortress in Europe, which contains a small lapidary collection and numerous cannons.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1461-1463
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rajko Keravica (20 months ago)
Really nice looking fort. The best view of it will be from pile plato. Also you can go down to pile harbour, nice view there as well!
Tork Mackenzie (21 months ago)
The Bokar fort is an impressive and impreganable tower on the city walls which look really impresive from the St Lawrence fortress
Urban Traveler (2 years ago)
One of the towers, looking at the sea, accesible from the walls tour.
Craig Rose (2 years ago)
Beautiful spot in Old Town. The views are breathtaking. Go early before the cruise ship people get there.
Al Miller (2 years ago)
Wall walk a MUST. Go early, very hot, avoid busy cruise ship days. Couple great refreshment/view points on ocean side. ( 150 Kn. p/p )
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Easter Aquhorthies Stone Circle

Easter Aquhorthies stone circle, located near Inverurie, is one of the best-preserved examples of a recumbent stone circle, and one of the few that still have their full complement of stones. It consists of a ring of nine stones, eight of which are grey granite and one red jasper. Two more grey granite stones flank a recumbent of red granite flecked with crystals and lines of quartz. The circle is particularly notable for its builders' use of polychromy in the stones, with the reddish ones situated on the SSW side and the grey ones opposite.

The placename Aquhorthies derives from a Scottish Gaelic word meaning 'field of prayer', and may indicate a 'long continuity of sanctity' between the Stone or Bronze Age circle builders and their much later Gaelic successors millennia later. The circle's surroundings were landscaped in the late 19th century, and it sits within a small fenced and walled enclosure. A stone dyke, known as a roundel, was built around the circle some time between 1847 and 1866–7.