Château de Castries

Castries, France

Château de Castries has belonged to the House of Castries since 1465. In 1565, Jacques de Castries undertook the building of a new château. The garden was laid out by André Le Nôtre in 1666. The aqueduct, to water the garden, was built by Pierre-Paul Riquet.

The main house was looted and damaged during the French Revolution of 1789 and was restored in 1828. In 1935, it was bought back by René de La Croix de Castries. In 1985, he donated the house to the Académie française. It is open to the public.

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Founded: 1565
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

judith mascarenhas (8 months ago)
Beautiful surroundings Chateau was opened to the public today a lot of interesting facts
Luciano Enriquez (2 years ago)
Beautiful place so quiet
Frédéric Versmee (2 years ago)
No visit possible. Quite beautiful from the outside.
anthony foucault (2 years ago)
Castle closed due to construction and covid I think. Only the park is accessible
David Vodnansky (3 years ago)
Castle closed, garden closed. As usual in France there is zero information when/if it will be open again. We were walking around with several additional groups of disappointed visitors.
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