Roman Bridge of Lugo

Lugo, Spain

The Roman bridge of Lugo is a bridge of Roman origin, that has been reconstructed and repaired several times. The bridge crosses the Minho river.

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Founded: 1st century AD
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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jose Mapuei (12 months ago)
Good views, nice place to take a walk and take a look of the city surroundings.
Julia O (2 years ago)
The old city remains totally enclosed by these ancient walls and there is a wide path to wall all along to top of the walls. Attractive city.
Nina I. (2 years ago)
Easy access, well maintained and so wonderfull to see the locals on their morning walk... Along a couple of thousands years
Mark Auchincloss (2 years ago)
UNESCO World Heritage Site as its the finest totally in tact Roman fortification in Western Europe. Dates back to 3rd Century. Over 2 km in length. As well as great views expect to see lots of local folk taking exercise or walking the dog.The locals say most things inside the walls are more expensive than outside!
Joseph Benny (2 years ago)
A great feat indeed. A fortress standing tall and intact for the past 1800 years is not a joke. You can stroll along this marvel which is around 2 kms long and enjoy the view of the city of Lugo.
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