The Freedom Monument

Riga, Latvia

The Freedom Monument if a symbol of independent Latvia. From the moment Latvia acquires its independence a search for a suitable artistic solution started and donations were gathered. The monument was built in 1931-35, its author was a well-known latvian architect Karlis Zale. The statue of Liberty (sculpturer R. Mirsmeden) holds three stars - the symbols of historical areas in Latvia: Kurzeme, Vidzeme, Latgale.

The pedestal is surrounded by sculptural compositions "Buards of Fatherland", "Mother Latvia", "Labour and Family" and others. The monument is turned to the West - the Liberty sculpture looks that way, proud sculptures of other compositions look the same way. Figures in chains, bent in a bow look the other way - to the East.

It is interesting to know that the symbol of independence of Latvia managed to survive the soviet times. According to the legend, Stalin planned to blow it up after the war but Vera Muhina, who was born in Riga and was a student of K. Zale, stood up for it. The monument, that was of a great artistic value, was not destroyed, but was indeed forgotten. Lenin's monument on the other side of the boulevard was built standing with its back to "Freedom" and its face to the East.

Naturally, during the "Perestroika" time, the Freedom Monument was the main place of meetings and piquets. In 1994 it was the place where Bill klinton supported the independent Baltic on behalf of America. The monument is also populr for the well-known maches of the vererans of the Latvian legion of SS in the 90s, that ended with laying flowers at the pedestal. These marches were banned by authorities for different reasons.

In 2001 the monument was reconstructed. It now has a guard of honour, festivities take place here.

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Address

Brīvības iela, Riga, Latvia
See all sites in Riga

Details

Founded: 1931-1935
Category: Statues in Latvia
Historical period: The Independent Republic (Latvia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

mojca killer (9 months ago)
I love the story behind it. The soroundings are beautiful, the parks... Great place to people watch. Also, cute soldiers
Adela Vitkovska (9 months ago)
Freedom monument in Riga is on of the most significant and known places in Riga and whole Latvia. It was buildt in 1935 and since then overlooks the roofs of Riga. The soldiers are protecting the statue during whole year ( but not all hours of the dqy) so if you are lucky you can see them or to experience the soldiers exchange routines by the statue.
Jeffrey Laing (9 months ago)
Was here right before the 100th independence celebration. There were tons of flowers laid around the base of the monument, along with nightly candle vigils. During the day, Soldiers in formal uniforms were guarding the monument. It was an impressive experience.
soly paul (10 months ago)
A spot in the middle of the city.. beautiful monument... during the day time there are guards standing in front of it ....u can take pics and move on to the next destination or spend some time in the near by park....
The Wandering Papa (13 months ago)
A beautiful place to visit. The adjoining park is also a must visit as from there you can go on a canal boat ride or also opt for renting the small paddle boats and enjoy. Do try and visit before 1pm as after that the guards would not be there. It would actually take a minute for anyone to realize that the guards standing there are real and not some mannequin. A good vibe to the whole place.
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