Calatubo Castle

Alcamo, Italy

The origins of the Calatubo Castle date back to some years before 1093, the year in which Roger I of Sicily defined the boundaries of the diocese of Mazara that included 'Calatubo with all its dependencies'.

In ancient times, around the castle there was the village of Calatubo, which based its business on the extraction of stones for water and wind mills from the quarries around the creek Finocchio, as mentioned by the Arab geographer Muhammad al-Idrisi in The Book of Roger, written in 1154.

The village of Calatubo was abandoned after the conquest by Frederick II and the castle lost its original function as a military fortress, turning into a farm. During this period, the castle joined warehouses, stables and other structures used for the administration of the agricultural fief of Calatubo.

Since the Middle Ages, because of its visibility, the Calatubo Castle had an important strategic role: it was part of a line of towers and forts along the coast from Palermo to Trapani; this defensive line was used to transmit light signals in case of Saracens' attack. In particular, the castle of Calatubo guaranteed the flow of information that took place between the outposts of Carini, Partinico and Castellammare del Golfo.

At the end of the nineteenth century in the second courtyard some warehouses were set up for the production of the wine 'Calatubo'.

The castle remained in good condition until the 1968 Belice earthquake. The use of the structure as a sheepfold and illegal excavations, which had as their targets the finds of the necropolis of the seventh century BC pertaining to the castle, have further ruined the castle. In 2007 it was bought by the municipality of Alcamo and over the past few years.

Description

The Calatubo Castle is actually an architectural complex, consisting of the structure of the original castle that has undergone several changes over the centuries. This complex is large 150×35 meters and stands on a limestone rock that lies at an altitude of about 152 m above sea level and that dominate with its height the surrounding area. From the position of castle you can clearly see Mount Bonifato and the Gulf of Castellammare.

The castle is inaccessible on three sides due to the steep walls of rock on which it is built. The only practicable access is located in the west, which leads to the first line of defense of the castle via a ramp with large steps. From the first line of defense, which includes among other things a well, a church hall and other premises, you can arrive at a court which communicates with the second circle of walls through a portal, up to the third circle of walls, which comprises an oblong tower. Finally the core of the castle, located in the southern part of the fortress, is rectangular with an area of 7×21.50 m.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gaetano Lipari (2 months ago)
Beautiful place to visit, it deserves a nice refurb
Miha S (9 months ago)
View of this castle is very good from highway passing by very close. Looking great
Gianni Caruso (13 months ago)
Very difficult to arrive at place
Ksay shade of (21 months ago)
The remains of this castle can be seen when you drive from Castellamare del Golfo to Palermo and back. The ruins of the castle are highlighted during the nighttime and it makes it even more visible from the road. Not sure if this place worth visiting unless you are a big fun of exploring ruins, because you'll have to plan your trip in advance - the castle is located very close to the motorway, but there's no side road near leading directly.
Tomasz Zarebski (23 months ago)
View of castle from autostrada is spectacular! Shame, it cant be visited
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