Archaeological area of ​​Cava d'Ispica

Modica, Italy

The Archaeological Park of Cava d'Ispica is located in the northern part of the valley which is extended among large and impressive gorges for about 14km. The monumental archaeological evidences which are currently visible have been found thanks to the excavations in the rock and they can be ascribed to three periods: the prehistoric period, the Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages.

Evidences of the Ancient Bronze Age (the Castelluccio age which dates back to 2200- 1450 BC) are a number of settlements scattered along the valley, with oven tombs necropolis. Among them, there is the necropolis of Baravitalla, located in the northern part of the quarry, with a monumental well preserved tomb, with a façade decorated with ten pillars. In the above plain, the remains of the village have been found, together with the original archaeological finds (e.g. plates with spheres) and numerous terracotta ornaments.

Even during the Late Antiquity, the valley featured an impressive necropolis with catacombs and small burial tombs. Among them, there is the Larderia catacomb, which is divided into three aisles and contains more than 400 burial graves, dating back to the 4th and 5th century A.D. Other Christian evidences can be found in the other burial area called “Camposanto caves”.

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Founded: 2200 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

The1Unic (17 months ago)
The place was an awesome experience, but only 3 stars, because most of the area at the time of this review was closed due to construction.
Mr Lofty (2 years ago)
It's ok, but to be honest, the water mill museum is the best bit. Paths to the caves are in a terrible state, & for some reason,y there was a massive fire stopping us going further. Water mill museum includes very effective multi language guide & is excellent.
Mr Lofty (2 years ago)
It's ok, but to be honest, the water mill museum is the best bit. Paths to the caves are in a terrible state, & for some reason,y there was a massive fire stopping us going further. Water mill museum includes very effective multi language guide & is excellent.
Christian Ansorge (2 years ago)
Most of the caves where closed. Despite the big amount of staff sitting at the entrace the necessary maintainace works to keep the place open (cleaning paths and repair fences) are simply not done. For sure the place is interesting but it is a crazy showcase how public adminstration works in Sicily
Christian Ansorge (2 years ago)
Most of the caves where closed. Despite the big amount of staff sitting at the entrace the necessary maintainace works to keep the place open (cleaning paths and repair fences) are simply not done. For sure the place is interesting but it is a crazy showcase how public adminstration works in Sicily
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