Kinloss Abbey is a Cistercian abbey founded in 1150 by King David I and was first colonised by monks from Melrose Abbey. It received its Papal Bull from Pope Alexander III in 1174, and later came under the protection of the Bishop of Moray in 1187. The abbey went on to become one of the largest and wealthiest religious houses in Scotland, receiving the valuable salmon fishing rights on the River Findhorn from Robert the Bruce in 1312, subsequently renewed by James I and James IV.

During its history the abbey has received many royal visitors, including Edward I in 1303, Edward III in 1336 and Mary, Queen of Scots, in 1562. The most renowned of the 24 abbots the monastery had was Robert Reid. Reid introduced organised education, erecting a new library and other buildings at the abbey. He became Bishop of Orkney in 1541 and, following his death, became the founder and benefactor of the University of Edinburgh with funds from his estate.

Few of the monastic buildings remain standing today. The remains of the abbey are now situated within a graveyard owned by the local authority, and are therefore accessible at all times. They are designated a scheduled ancient monument.

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Kinloss, Forres, United Kingdom
See all sites in Forres

Details

Founded: 1150
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Allan MacIver (2 years ago)
The Abbey at Kinloss is ruinous but what remains gives some idea of the size of the place. The Abbey is signposted and there is limited parking. The Abbey and graveyard are in immaculate conditon. In this graveyard are many Commonwealth War Graves. During the Second World War there was a Royal Air Force(RAF) training base at Kinloss. It is quite moving to walk and take note of those who gave their lives. I left this place very humbled.
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