Pluscarden Abbey is a Roman Catholic Benedictine monastery in the glen of the Black Burn, 6 miles south-west of Elgin. It was founded in 1230 by Alexander II for the Valliscaulian Order.

In 1454, following a merger with the priory of Urquhart, Pluscarden Priory became a Benedictine House. The Scottish Reformation saw the decline of the priory, and by 1680 it was in a ruinous condition. Some work to arrest decay took place in the late 19th century. In 1948, the priory became a house of the Subiaco Cassinese Congregation of Benedictines, and restoration began at the hands of monks from Prinknash Abbey in Gloucestershire. In 1966, the priory received its independence from the mother-house; it was elevated to abbatial status in 1974.

The abbey welcomes guests, and occasionally conducts formal retreats. Silence is generally observed in the church, refectory and other monastic areas. Guests often help with the manual work of the abbey.

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Founded: 1230
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

James P. (10 months ago)
Peacefull restful place to which I have stayed before; with voluntary work available to take your mind off things.
Paweł A (12 months ago)
Simply fantastic abbey located in the middle of nowhere, so silent around it. You can easily feel God around the place. Shame it is still closed for visitors because of covid.
Jon Mackley (12 months ago)
A very peaceful place.
Clive Richards (17 months ago)
A beautiful and brilliant Abbey and Priory ! It's so peaceful and quiet to visit especially for self prayers ! It's like going back in History !!! It's definitely one of my favourite Christian buildings. I feel empowered and free when within the beautiful grounds and Abbey.
Marc Turner (18 months ago)
One of the nicest abbeys I have been too. Set in amazing surroundings. We were there there isn't much of the chapel open to the public so you can't explore that but it is a working abbey so understandble
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