The earliest records of Kellie go back to 1150 where it is mentioned in a charter issued by King David I. The first known owner was Robert of London, the illegitimate son of King William the Lion. None of the early buildings to have survived.

The estate was signed over to a Siward relative, Walter Oliphant, in 1360 and the castle remained in the ownership of the Oliphant family until 1613. It was purchased by Sir Thomas Erskine, who had saved the life of King James VI during the Gowrie Conspiracy. The King stayed at Kellie in 1617 during his only visit to Scotland after the Union of the Crowns, and he appointed Erskine as Earl of Kellie in 1619.

Originally a simple tower house, the lower section of what now constitutes the northwest tower is the oldest part of the castle, dating from around 1360, and is said to be haunted. In 1573 a new tower was built by the 4th Lord Oliphant to the east of the original tower. It is believed that the 4th Lord built the east tower as a jointure-house (a property set aside for the wife after the husband's death) for his wife Margaret. Between 1573 and 1606 the two towers were linked by a new range, terminated by another tower in the south-west, creating the T-plan layout that remains today. The castle is a fine example of Scots Baronial domestic architecture, with an imposing mix of gables, corbelled towers, and chimneys.

The walled garden is 17th century, with late Victorian additions, contains a fine collection of old-fashioned roses, fruit trees and herbaceous plants.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Jill Bentley (4 months ago)
Garden fee £3 for daughter £2 for me grandson free. But £2 for parking your car! I am a gardener and thought the garden would inspire me but sadly not. It seemed unkempt and no colour coordination or wow factor and not many scented plantings which I remember from years ago. The tree surround seat was broken with nails sticking up and loose bits of wood. We walked with my 2 year old grandson through the path in the wood. Which was lined by nettles. Why were these not cut back? We are local but won't be back sadly.
Karen Crouch (4 months ago)
The castle itself is small but beautiful. We booked a guided tour and found it really interesting. Outside there are beautiful gardens to walk round and a small tea shop
Jenna B (5 months ago)
Only visited the gardens today but they were absolutely beautiful! Such a nice walk around the castle and gardens. I would definitely recommend it!
Susan Johnston (13 months ago)
Historic
dddjjhiga (13 months ago)
Beautiful
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