The first Christian church was probably a wooden church. Of this church there is no trace, but the baptismal font in the Church today has probably belonged to this church. In the 1220s a new stone church of considerable size was built in round-headed Romanesque style and consisted of a nave with four pillars, chancel with two cross-arms and apse, an extension in the rear of the chancel where the altar was placed. A large tower in the west would be part of the building, but it never came to execution. The nave is left intact to this day. Lau church is the island’s largest country church. It is famous for its unique acoustics.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

144, Lau, Sweden
See all sites in Lau

Details

Founded: 1220s
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Beate Finke (5 months ago)
Very beautiful church
Jasper van der Capellen (6 months ago)
Beautiful church with interesting photo exhibition with information about the history of the area. However, the interiors were not as rich as churches usually are.
Anders Larsson (7 months ago)
A lovely medieval church that is very different from other churches both outside and inside, well worth a visit
Gustav Randér (2 years ago)
A unique and fantastic church, undeniably worth a visit. Contains enriching exhibits on the history of the parish when I visited Lau, which gave a vivid picture of the past and its population.
Markus Roupe (2 years ago)
Awesome acoustics go your way and sing vettja!
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Amphitheatre of the Three Gauls

The Amphitheatre of the Three Gauls was part of the federal sanctuary of the three Gauls dedicated to the cult of Rome and Augustus celebrated by the 60 Gallic tribes when they gathered at Lugdunum (Lyon). The amphitheatre was built at the foot of the La Croix-Rousse hill at what was then the confluence of the Rhône and Saône.

Excavations have revealed a basement of three elliptical walls linked by cross-walls and a channel surrounding the oval central arena. The arena was slightly sloped, with the building"s south part supported by a now-vanished vault. The arena"s dimensions are 67,6m by 42m. This phase of the amphitheatre housed games which accompanied the imperial cult, with its low capacity (1,800 seats) being enough for delegations from the 60 Gallic tribes.

The amphitheatre was expanded at the start of the 2nd century. Two galleries were added around the old amphitheatre, raising its width from 25 metres to 105 metres and its capacity to about 20,000 seats. In so doing it made it a building open to the whole population of Lugdunum and its environs.