St. Hans' & St. Peter's Church Ruins

Visby, Sweden

St. Hans and St. Peter churches were built side by side during the 1200s. St. Peter was consecrated to the apostle Peter. St. Hans, which was the larger church, was dedicated to St. John the Evangelist. It was where the Lutheran doctrine for the first time preached on the island. In 1527, however, Bishop Brask turned Lutherans out from the church. But as soon as the bishop sailed to Denmark, Lutherans worships were started again. Churches were demolished in 1600-1800s and the stone was used among others to construct Lythbergska house. In 1982 a beautifully decorated gravestone was found in the ruins of in St. Hans, dating from 1050s.

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Address

S:t Hansgatan 11, Visby, Sweden
See all sites in Visby

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bailey Bruce (11 months ago)
Beautiful setting,very relaxed amongst the ruins in the outside garden.The service from staff was ok but could be much better.I want to feel loved and cherished when spending my hard earnt money.x
Tony Arkey (11 months ago)
Our visit coincided with a renowned Mardi Gras swing band in full swing over lunch . A memorable few hours. Oh and the food choice was really good. Iconic cafe set amongst the castle ruins. Great for families in rear gardens amongst the famous ruins. This was one hot summers day at 34°C +/- over this past few weeks.
John Strauss (13 months ago)
Great place to sit indoors or out. The inside seating has windows wide open. Easy place to sit for an hour and ponder history
曹晓芳 (2 years ago)
The cafe is in S:t Pers ruin. Very cozy environment. You can choose to sit outside or inside, both are very nice. There is children's menu for those people visit together with their kids. The ciniman buns is not so good, but the shrimp sallad is good. They also a bar sell wines and beers.
Daniel Grönjord (2 years ago)
Café with nice outdoor seating at the small square in front and in the lovely garden with ruins in the back.
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