Clackmannan Tower is a five-storey tower house, situated at the summit of King's Seat Hill in Clackmannan. It dates back to at least the 14th century, when it was inhabited by King David II of Scotland, and David is recorded as selling it to his cousin Robert Bruce in 1359.

Clackmannan Tower is located on King's Seat Hill, on the western edge of the town of Clackmannan in the Scottish county of Clackmannanshire. The tower is at an elevation of 55 metres above sea level, with views of the River Forth to the south and the Ochil Hills to the north. The tower is largely still intact from its medieval days, including the roof, although part of the eastern wall was reconstructed following a collapse in 1950. The building is L-shaped, with five storeys. The original part of the building is on the north, and the slightly higher 1500s wing to the south, using cut blocks of pink sandstone. The newer section features a fireplace on the second floor, typical of its period. Gardens and an area probably once used as a bowling green are situated to the south of the tower, while a large platform is on the northern side.

The land on which the tower stands was the originally the property of the Crown of Scotland, and in the late 12th century the town of Clackmannan was home to a mill belonging to the monks of the Cambuskenneth Abbey. It it not known exactly when the original tower was constructed, and local tradition asserts that it was built by Robert the Bruce. King David II Bruce was recorded as being in residence at the town in 1329, and the tower may have been constructed by then. In 1359, David sold the site, including a hunting lodge, to his cousin Sir Robert Bruce, possibly with a view to keeping it in the possession of the Bruce family and not as a royal asset.

In around 1500 the south wing was added, and in the seventeenth century a moat and drawbridge were built as well as surrounding walls.

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Stuart Middleton (10 months ago)
Historical Tower. Nicely underdeveloped. Great views over Forth. Good for a nice peaceful hour or two.
macedonboy (11 months ago)
A tower house, and one of many in Fife. This tower house belongs to the Scottish crown, mostly associated with the House of Bruce. The tower was abandoned long ago, but is in good condition. The tower is mostly intact, while another part of the building attached to the tower seems to have collapsed long ago with only the outer wall still standing. The interior is closed to the public. It's free to view from the outside and there's two information boards providing description and interpretation of the tower house, which gives context to the building.
macedonboy (11 months ago)
A tower house, and one of many in Fife. This tower house belongs to the Scottish crown, mostly associated with the House of Bruce. The tower was abandoned long ago, but is in good condition. The tower is mostly intact, while another part of the building attached to the tower seems to have collapsed long ago with only the outer wall still standing. The interior is closed to the public. It's free to view from the outside and there's two information boards providing description and interpretation of the tower house, which gives context to the building.
Russell Kidd (13 months ago)
Nice quiet place. Unfortunately not open to the public. But there are some of the most fantastic views all around the area from looking towards the Ochil Hills to looking down into the Forth Valley.
Russell Kidd (13 months ago)
Nice quiet place. Unfortunately not open to the public. But there are some of the most fantastic views all around the area from looking towards the Ochil Hills to looking down into the Forth Valley.
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