St Mungo Museum of Religious Life and Art

Glasgow, United Kingdom

The St Mungo Museum of Religious Life and Art is located in Cathedral Square, on the lands of Glasgow Cathedral off High Street. It was constructed in 1989 on the site of a medieval castle-complex, the former residence of the bishops of Glasgow, parts of which can be seen inside the Cathedral and at the People's Palace, Glasgow. The museum building emulates the Scottish Baronial architectural style used for the former bishop's castle. The museum opened in 1993.

The museum houses exhibits relating to all the world's major religions, including a Zen garden and a sculpture showing Islamic calligraphy. It housed Salvador Dalí’s painting Christ of Saint John of the Cross from its opening in 1993 until the reopening of Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum in 2006.

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Details

Founded: 1989
Category: Museums in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Francios Mouillet (8 months ago)
loved it, would come to glasgow just for this
James Love (2 years ago)
It will not matter a jot of what religion you are ,this is a must for people to visit ,the peacefulness of this superb place is second to none.
James Love (2 years ago)
It will not matter a jot of what religion you are ,this is a must for people to visit ,the peacefulness of this superb place is second to none.
ginaszoo36 (2 years ago)
Interesting place. Well worth a visit. The staff were helpful.
ginaszoo36 (2 years ago)
Interesting place. Well worth a visit. The staff were helpful.
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