The Provand's Lordship of Glasgow is a medieval historic house museum located at the top of Castle Street. It was built as part of St Nicholas's Hospital by Andrew Muirhead, Bishop of Glasgow in 1471. A western extension, designed by William Bryson, was completed in 1670.

In the early 19th century the house was occupied by a canon supported by income from the Lord of the Prebend (or 'Provand') of Barlanark. Later that century it was acquired by the Morton Family who used it as a sweet shop. Following a generous donation Sir William Burrell, in the form of cash as well a collection of seventeenth-century Scottish furniture in the late 1920s, the house was bought by the specially-formed Provand's Lordship Society, whose aim was to protect it. In 1978, the building was acquired by the City of Glasgow who restored it. It was reopened to the public in 1983, and, following further restoration work which lasted two years, re-opened again in 2000.

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Founded: 1471
Category: Museums in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Aravind S (14 months ago)
Really Nice place..
David Wilson (19 months ago)
Very interesting. I originally come from the city of Glasgow and have made an effort to visit as many Glasgow museum type sites. The history told in the details and pictures available is amazing.
ムジブMariner (21 months ago)
It's a fine experience to visit this museum. One will be wondering how a house build during the medieval era still standing strong. For the structure build during the 1400's it's quite remarkable restoration work that has been carried out. Worth a visit. The highlight is the kids area on top floor .
rajeesh r (2 years ago)
A must visit place. I was exploring the tourist attraction and initially didn't notice this building. Stepping into the room will give you feel of traveling back to history. The architecture and the wood work is worth giving attention.
Susan Andrew (2 years ago)
A totally fascinating place. More than almost anywhere else I've been, Provand's Lordship really gives you a sense of what it would have been like to have been living here, hundreds of years ago. So atmospheric, and not 'sanitised' - those floors are uneven and the stairs are slightly scary, which is great: I hate when everything is cleaned up and pretty. Highly recommended.
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