Blackcraig Castle is a Baronial mansion house close to the towns of Ballintuim and Blairgowrie on the banks of the River Ardle. It was built in 1856 by Patrick Allan Fraser, a prominent Scottish artist and architect, and is designated as a Class B-listed building, with its walled garden A-listed. It has undergone extensive renovations/modernisation in recent years to return it to its full former glory and remains one of the finest examples of Baronial architecture in Scotland.

Surveys suggest that, originally occupying the site of Blackcraig Castle was a 16th-century tower house thought to be the property of the Maxwells’, who were in possession of the barony of Ballmacreuchy by 1550.

The current owners have been renovating Blackcraig and its policies since 2013 with a view to returning it to its former splendour. Two tasteful self-contained holiday apartments have also been incorporated and are available to rent. Although the castle and its policies are private, there are plans to open them to the public for events in the future.

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Details

Founded: 1856
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Chloe McIntyre (11 days ago)
Such a unique, peaceful setting. Perfect location to relax but with plenty to do within an hours drive. Will definitely return!
Lee Hunter-Mckenna (52 days ago)
Amazing place to stay, totally unique setting.
Steven Heyworth (3 months ago)
Beautiful,I want to live here
Derek Brown (8 months ago)
Great getaway. Very peaceful. Lovely accommodation.
Ross Pyres (8 months ago)
Frankly the coolest place I've ever stayed. Lovely place, amazing scenery and a nice warm welcome.
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