Ross Priory is an early 19th-century country house located west of Gartocharn, West Dunbartonshire. From the 14th century the estate, known as The Ross, was owned by a branch of the Buchanan family of Buchanan Castle, who built a house here in 1695. The present house is the result of remodelling by James Gillespie Graham and was complete in 1816. The term 'priory' does not imply ecclesiastical provenance, but is simply a 19th-century romantic affectation. Sir Walter Scott spent time at Ross Priory in the years following the rebuilding. It was owned by subsequent members of the Leith-Buchanan family until the later 20th century. In 1973 it was sold to Strathclyde University and now serves as a recreational and conference centre.

Ross Priory is protected as a category A listed building, and the grounds are included on the Inventory of Gardens and Designed Landscapes in Scotland, the national listing of significant gardens.

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Founded: 1816
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Charles Boden (2 years ago)
Sat here, finishing breakfast on our last day, after watching a very close friend getting married on the grounds, I am just gutted to be saying goodbye to this place, the place is gorgeous, the rooms lovely, the food unbelievably good, and the best part was the staff, so friendly and helpful, from the manager down to the cleaning lady, 5 stars in everything, some parts should get 6, they really were that good.
William Thomson (2 years ago)
Beautiful building in a stunning location. Fantastic gardens. Good evening meal. Lovely staff.
Tia Fontaine (2 years ago)
Beautiful
Alice McWillliam (2 years ago)
Excellent food served by very professional waitng staff - couldn't fault it
dranthonylewis drtony (2 years ago)
Great location and services
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