The Glasgow Necropolis is a Victorian age cemetery on a low but very prominent hill to the east of Glasgow Cathedral. Fifty thousand individuals have been buried here. Typical for the period, only a small percentage are named on monuments and not every grave has a stone. Approximately 3,500 monuments exist here.

Predating the cemetery, the statue of John Knox sitting on a column at the top of the hill, dates from 1825. The first burials were in 1832 in the extreme north-east on the lowest ground and were exclusively for Jewish burials.

Alexander Thomson designed a number of its tombs, and John Bryce and David Hamilton designed other architecture for the grounds.

The main entrance is approached by a bridge over what was then the Molendinar Burn. The bridge, which was designed by David Hamilton was completed in 1836. It became known as the 'Bridge of Sighs' because it was part of the route of funeral processions (the name is an allusion to the Bridge of Sighs in Venice). The ornate gates (by both David and James Hamilton) were erected in 1838, restricting access onto the bridge.

Three modern memorials lie between the gates and the bridge: a memorial to still-born children, a memorial to the Korean War and a memorial to Glaswegian recipients of the Victoria Cross.

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Glasgow, United Kingdom
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Vishnu Prasad (6 months ago)
Great place to go for an evening walk. If you want to spice things up, visit the Necropolis at midnight for some scary vibes. The view of Glasgow from the top is beautiful. There are no facilities in the park - no food or restrooms. On days of snow, the path is extremely slippery.
Craig Bull (9 months ago)
Absolutely fascinating place to visit. Some amazing monuments. You could spend a few good hours going round this.
A. Sekaringtias (9 months ago)
Definitely worth a visit if you're looking to explore the city. Situated just next to the cathedral, giving another reason not to miss the area. The hike is not really that steep so don't worry if you are not that fit.
A. Sekar (9 months ago)
Definitely worth a visit if you're looking to explore the city. Situated just next to the cathedral, giving another reason not to miss the area. The hike is not really that steep so don't worry if you are not that fit.
Adityan A (10 months ago)
Atmosphere is really good. A good brisk walk and the top view is pretty nice. You can see most of Glasgow from the top. Next time I go there I will bring my camera so that I can capture some amazing pictures of the city.
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