Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum

Glasgow, United Kingdom

Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum is one of Scotland's most popular visitor attractions. The museum has 22 galleries, housing a range of exhibits, including Renaissance art, taxidermy, and artifacts from ancient Egypt.

The gallery is located on Argyle Street, on the banks of the River Kelvin. The construction of Kelvingrove was partly financed by the proceeds of the 1888 International Exhibition held in Kelvingrove Park. 

Kelvingrove was reopened by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in 2006 after a three-year closure for major refurbishment and restoration.

Collections

The museum's collections came mainly from the McLellan Galleries and from the old Kelvingrove House Museum in Kelvingrove Park. It has one of the finest collections of arms and armour in the world and a vast natural history collection. The art collection includes many outstanding European artworks, including works by the Old Masters (Vecellio's Madonna and Child with Saint Jerome and Saint Dorothy, Rembrandt van Rijn, Gerard de Lairesse, and Jozef Israëls), French Impressionists (such as Claude Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Camille Pissarro, Vincent van Gogh and Mary Cassatt), Dutch Renaissance, Scottish Colourists and exponents of the Glasgow School.

The museum houses Christ of Saint John of the Cross by Salvador Dalí. The copyright of this painting was bought by the curator at the time after a meeting with Dalí himself. For a period between 1993 and 2006, the painting was moved to the St Mungo Museum of Religious Life and Art.

The museum also contains a large gift of the decorative arts from Anne Hull Grundy, an art collector and philanthropist, covering the history of European jewellery in the 18th and 19th centuries.

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Details

Founded: 1901
Category: Museums in United Kingdom

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Timothy Arnold-Moore (7 months ago)
Well worth a visit! Organ recital at 1pm most days. Lots of interesting exhibits. Famous Dali and great museum store. Walk up the hill when done and visit the museum at Glasgow University as well.
Peter Smith (12 months ago)
Great museum and art gallery. Always well worth a visit. Due to covid restrictions tickets are required booked in advance. They remain free. Book up and enjoy the trip. Last ticket is for 3pm. The museum closes at 4. An hour is not long enough to see much, get an earlier ticket.
David Carpenter (12 months ago)
Plenty of variety, lots to see...5*
David Carpenter (12 months ago)
Plenty of variety, lots to see...5*
F khan (12 months ago)
It was a huge museum but unfortunately we didn't book tickets before so we could not go inside. I advise everyone please book tickets before you go there.
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