Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum

Glasgow, United Kingdom

Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum is one of Scotland's most popular visitor attractions. The museum has 22 galleries, housing a range of exhibits, including Renaissance art, taxidermy, and artifacts from ancient Egypt.

The gallery is located on Argyle Street, on the banks of the River Kelvin. The construction of Kelvingrove was partly financed by the proceeds of the 1888 International Exhibition held in Kelvingrove Park. 

Kelvingrove was reopened by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in 2006 after a three-year closure for major refurbishment and restoration.

Collections

The museum's collections came mainly from the McLellan Galleries and from the old Kelvingrove House Museum in Kelvingrove Park. It has one of the finest collections of arms and armour in the world and a vast natural history collection. The art collection includes many outstanding European artworks, including works by the Old Masters (Vecellio's Madonna and Child with Saint Jerome and Saint Dorothy, Rembrandt van Rijn, Gerard de Lairesse, and Jozef Israëls), French Impressionists (such as Claude Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Camille Pissarro, Vincent van Gogh and Mary Cassatt), Dutch Renaissance, Scottish Colourists and exponents of the Glasgow School.

The museum houses Christ of Saint John of the Cross by Salvador Dalí. The copyright of this painting was bought by the curator at the time after a meeting with Dalí himself. For a period between 1993 and 2006, the painting was moved to the St Mungo Museum of Religious Life and Art.

The museum also contains a large gift of the decorative arts from Anne Hull Grundy, an art collector and philanthropist, covering the history of European jewellery in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1901
Category: Museums in United Kingdom

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gill D (4 months ago)
What a great place. Amazing building. Full of treasures, brilliant selection of art work, historical treasures and natural history sections. All displayed clearly with easy to understand information. Best selection we’d seen in one place for a long time. Thoroughly enjoyed our day here. Good cafe too. Highly recommended
Gillian Long (5 months ago)
Beautiful place to visit, unbelievable that entry is free, we spent 2 hours looking around and I don’t think we saw it all, definitely worth the visit. The bridge over the river at the back of the museum is also really nice it has big statues and there’s a small pedestrian bridge to the left of the property at the front that’s pretty, you can see the ventilated spire on the university from here too.
Ceri Jones (7 months ago)
Fantastic museum and even more amazing that it's free too. Huge space with so many different things to see, highly recommended and only around 35-40 min walk from the city centre. Beautiful gardens around it too can imagine its crazy there in the summer!!
Steven Digby (16 months ago)
A wonderful way to spend a Summer afternoon. Walk through the park to the museum and back again. Lovely. The dinosaurs are not local but it's still fun to walk under and around. The art is spectacular and sometimes amusing. Something for everyone over age 7.
Timothy Arnold-Moore (18 months ago)
Well worth a visit! Organ recital at 1pm most days. Lots of interesting exhibits. Famous Dali and great museum store. Walk up the hill when done and visit the museum at Glasgow University as well.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Seaplane Harbour Museum

The Seaplane Harbour is the newest and one of the most exciting museums in Tallinn. It tells stories about the Estonian maritime and military history. The museum’s display, that comprises of more than a couple of hundred large exhibits, revitalizes the colourful history of Estonia.

British built submarine Lembit weighing 600 tones is the centrepiece of the new museum. Built in 1936 for the Estonian navy, Lembit served in the World War II under the Soviet flag. It remained in service for 75 years being the oldest submarine in the World still in use until it was hauled ashore in 2011. Despite its long history, Lembit is still in an excellent condition offering a glimpse of the 1930s art of technology.

Another exciting attraction is a full-scale replica of Short Type 184, a British pre-World War II seaplane, which was also used by the Estonian armed forces. Short Type 184 has earned its place in military history by being the first aircraft ever to attack an enemy’s ship with an air-launched torpedo. Since none of the original seaplanes have survived, the replica in Seaplane Harbour is the only full-size representation of the aircraft in the whole World.

Simulators mimicking a flight above Tallinn, around-the-world journey in the yellow submarine, navigating on the Tallinn bay make this museum heaven for kids or adventurous adults.

Seaplane Harbour operates in architecturally unique hangars built almost a century ago, in 1916 and 1917, as a part of Peter the Great sea fortress. These hangars are the World’s first reinforced concrete shell structures of such a great size. Charles Lindbergh, the man who performed the first solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean, landed here in 1930s.

On the outdoor area visitors can tour a collection of historic ships, including the Suur Tõll, Europe's largest steam-powered icebreaker.