Château de Villesavin

Tour-en-Sologne, France

Villesavin, built between 1527-1537 by Jean Breton, was his home while he supervised works at Château de Chambord nearby. Stone carvers from the royal château ornamented Villesavin.

Villesavin is one of the least altered of the many late-Renaissance châteaux in the Loire Valley. Low walls and unusually high roofs has been built around three very spacious courtyards. The elegant southern facade ends with a large dovecote. The château’s essentially domestic spirit is also evident in the service court, overlooked by a spacious kitchen with a working pit.

The interesting collection of old carriages on display includes an 18m long voiture de chasse with four rows of seat, from which ladies could watch the hunt.

References:
  • Eyewitness Travel Guide: Loire Valley. 2007

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Details

Founded: 1527-1537
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Malcolm Connop (2 years ago)
Great area lovely people.
Simon Rose (2 years ago)
Nice château. As with most the grounds are cheaper than going inside. There is a small "farm" to see with a handful of animals (goats, chickens, rabbits, a pony and donkeys. Nice gardens for a picnic and a pleasant walk round the outside of the chateau. Also fed the fish! 6€ entry for grounds.
Jan Luse (2 years ago)
Lovely chateau but if you want to see the inside you pay more for a tour or you just see the outside for your admission price.
Mark Edwards (2 years ago)
Beautiful place worth a visit
Erwin Reijgers (3 years ago)
Spectacular architecture! Worth a visit. Was able to go in late spring mid-week so crowds were not bad. There's a lot more to see since the last time I was there 15 years ago.
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