Church of Santa Maria de Arbas

Villamanín, Spain

Church of Santa Maria de Arbas is a good example of late León romanesque, built during the 12th and 13th centuries. It once belonged to the regular order of Saint Agustin. The church has three naves and four pillars supporting the round arches that separate the naves.

It was officially founded in the 12th century by the Count Fruela, El Cid's brother in law.It was ruled as a Colegiata (Collegiate Church) and a Hospedería (Hostelry) by the Augustine monks.As a result of its decline, it became a simple parish church. It was restored after the Civil War. The building consists of fine grey limestone blocks. The gothic chapel was added later, in the 12th century. The sacristy, the tower, the portico and the vaulting of the main nave date from the 17th century.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

www.turismocastillayleon.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jose Manuel Llamazares (12 months ago)
Sober collegiate church, thick walls, I think they open every day in summer. The beautiful environment, if you like trekking, go up to Cellon peak (there is a way to the top).
Santiago Aldidea (16 months ago)
Beautiful building. Difficult to visit.
Santiago Aldidea (16 months ago)
Beautiful building. Difficult to visit.
Manuel Muñoz (2 years ago)
I pass at least a couple of times a week; and I always try to imagine the steps in the winter, at the time when this ecclesiastical building was created. That had to be tough.
Manuel Muñoz (2 years ago)
I pass at least a couple of times a week; and I always try to imagine the steps in the winter, at the time when this ecclesiastical building was created. That had to be tough.
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