The Abbey of Cunault was founded in 847 by monks of Noirmoutiers (an island near Nantes) who had fled the Norman invasions. In 862 further incursions forced the Benedictine monks to flee to Tournus in Burgundy where they hid the relics of their patron Saint-Philibert. They returned during the 11th century and built a prosperous priory that remained under the control of Tournus.

The impressive Romanesque belfry, enlarged during the 15th century with a stone spire, is all that remains of the church built during the 11th century. The interior of the church is remarkable for the size and height of its 223 richly decorated capitals.

One of the lateral chapels contains the shrine of Saint-Maxenceul that was carved and painted during the 13th century. The four bells of the tower come from the cathedral of Constantine in Algeria.

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Details

Founded: 847
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Frankish kingdoms (France)

More Information

www.travelfranceonline.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andrew Masson (4 years ago)
Wonderful location, beautiful church
jean sampson (5 years ago)
Very beautiful- spend time looking at the capitals.
Stephanie Davidson (5 years ago)
Wonderful old church with amazing modern stained glass. A peaceful and uplifting enclave in central Dinan
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