Dolmen de Bagneux

Saumur, France

The famous Dolmen in Bagneux is probably one of the most majestic French dolmens and the largest of the 4,500 dolmens spread out on about 60 French departments.The overall length of this dolmen is over 23 meters (75 feet) and its chamber is over 18 meters (60 feet) long. As all dolmens, the 'Great Covered stone" in Bagneux, was a large chamber tomb which must have contained a great number of prehistoric skeletons during the neolithic age, i.e.from 4,000 to 2,000 B.C., that is about 5,000 years ago. 

Only suppositions can be made on the way the dolmens were built.The flagstones must  have been raised several times with numerous levers while pebbles were slid underneath the stone.Once it was raised to a certain level, and lying on a heap of pebbles, it was easier to pull it further. Then, the same operation started all over again.

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Artur said 5 years ago
The dolmens and other megaliths (pyramids, cromlechs, and others) were built for defense. Read more http://forum.ozersk.ru/topic/32337-raskritie-tain-drevnosti/


Details

Founded: 4000-2000 BC
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in France
Historical period: Prehistoric Age (France)

Rating

3.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Chris Bown (2 years ago)
Can only give it one star as it was locked up even though it was supposed to be open.
Philippe C (2 years ago)
Il est très difficile d'attribuer une note a cet endroit. D'une part, il est très appréciable de pouvoir accéder à un des plus grands mégalithes ( et encore je pense qu'il devait initialement comporter une antichambre aujourd'hui disparue), de pouvoir le toucher et le photographier a souhait, pour quelques modiques euros.D'autre part il manque clairement dans le grand Saumur un centre dédié aux sites néolithiques de la région. La plupart ne sont pas indiqués ou s'ils le sont ne bénéficient d'aucune mise en évidence. Le dolmen pourrait être un très bon point de départ moyennant un investissement des pouvoirs publics.
francoise chamault (2 years ago)
Nous y amenons souvent des amis qui sont toujours impressionnés par la grandeur du dolmen et son degré de conservation C’est une visite qui ne prend pas beaucoup de temps que je recommande
András Kovács (3 years ago)
Spent hours to get there and it was not open at 3 pm on Sunday.
Daniel Flynn (3 years ago)
Great little site! Worth the 4 euro fee to see!
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