Dolmen de Bagneux

Saumur, France

The famous Dolmen in Bagneux is probably one of the most majestic French dolmens and the largest of the 4,500 dolmens spread out on about 60 French departments.The overall length of this dolmen is over 23 meters (75 feet) and its chamber is over 18 meters (60 feet) long. As all dolmens, the 'Great Covered stone" in Bagneux, was a large chamber tomb which must have contained a great number of prehistoric skeletons during the neolithic age, i.e.from 4,000 to 2,000 B.C., that is about 5,000 years ago. 

Only suppositions can be made on the way the dolmens were built.The flagstones must  have been raised several times with numerous levers while pebbles were slid underneath the stone.Once it was raised to a certain level, and lying on a heap of pebbles, it was easier to pull it further. Then, the same operation started all over again.

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Artur said 6 years ago
The dolmens and other megaliths (pyramids, cromlechs, and others) were built for defense. Read more http://forum.ozersk.ru/topic/32337-raskritie-tain-drevnosti/


Details

Founded: 4000-2000 BC
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in France
Historical period: Prehistoric Age (France)

Rating

3.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sarah Jallow (2 years ago)
It wasn’t open! So frustrating since we went out of our way to get here.
Susan Macmillan (2 years ago)
Visited in October and found it closed although advertised as being open. This is a site of historical significance and, as other reviewers have suggested, it should not be in private ownership if the proprietors are not prepared to open it reliably. It is hidden behind high walls and bushes but you may be able to get a glimpse through if you're lucky! ?
Mike Pope (2 years ago)
Not worth one star - visited today 26 June 2019 and despite ringing the bell as the sign indicated, it was not open. A real shame as it is one of the most significant sites in France. It clearly should be in the ownership of the local commune and not a private owner.
Chris Bown (3 years ago)
Can only give it one star as it was locked up even though it was supposed to be open.
Philippe C (3 years ago)
Il est très difficile d'attribuer une note a cet endroit. D'une part, il est très appréciable de pouvoir accéder à un des plus grands mégalithes ( et encore je pense qu'il devait initialement comporter une antichambre aujourd'hui disparue), de pouvoir le toucher et le photographier a souhait, pour quelques modiques euros.D'autre part il manque clairement dans le grand Saumur un centre dédié aux sites néolithiques de la région. La plupart ne sont pas indiqués ou s'ils le sont ne bénéficient d'aucune mise en évidence. Le dolmen pourrait être un très bon point de départ moyennant un investissement des pouvoirs publics.
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