Madeleine Dolmen

Gennes, France

Dolmen de la Madeleine is an isolated dolmen located in a private field on the outskirts of the town of Gennes. It was probably built between 5 000-2 000 BC. There are a number of these sites in the area - but this one is said to be the largest. Like many of the larger dolmens, it has subsequently been re-used, in this case to house a bread oven. Although the bread oven is no longer in use as the dolmen is now a classified national monument, you can still see the remains of the oven.

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Details

Founded: 5000-2000 BC
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in France
Historical period: Prehistoric Age (France)

More Information

www.archaeology-travel.com

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5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

cerrelavis peter (4 years ago)
PIERRE HENRI (4 years ago)
Oeuvre très ancienne, plus de 5000 ans, dont la construction reste une énigme. C'est un dolmen imposant un des plus grand de la région. Dolmen de type angevin (on les trouve essentiellement en Anjou, comme le nom l'indique, quelquefois en Bretagne ou ailleurs) dont la caractéristique est d'avoir une entrée ressemblant à un péristyle. Ici le péristyle a disparu, ce qui a fait douter de son caractère de dolmen angevin. Ce dolmen a servit au siècle précédent de boulangerie ! On peut y voir les restes d'un four à pain et ceux de l'entourage d'une porte en tuffeau.
valerie level (4 years ago)
A voir
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