Château du Plessis-Bourré

Soulaire-et-Bourg, France

Château du Plessis-Bourré is a château built in less than 5 years from 1468 to 1472 by Finance Minister Jean Bourré, the principal advisor to King Louis XI. The château has not been modified externally since its construction and still has a fully working drawbridge. It was classified as a Monument historique in 1931.

The château was purchased in 1911 by Henry Vaïsse who, when he died in 1956, bequeathed it to his nephew, François Reille-Soult, Duke of Dalmatie. Thereafter it remained the property of different members of the Reille-soult de Dalmatie family. The château is currently managed by Aymeric d'Anthenaise and Jean-Francois Reille-Soult of Dalmatie and is open to the public. The Château du Plessis-Bourré has been the location setting for numerous films.

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Founded: 1468-1472
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

3.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

thierry HERVÉ (6 years ago)
Très bien reçu et bien manger je vous remercie à bientôt
Marie-Rose Perret (6 years ago)
Génial
Joelle gaillard (6 years ago)
Beaucoup de charmes dans cette auberge de village. On n y mange très bien. Les patrons sont très sympas. Avons passés une très agréable soirée.
Louis-Nicolas (6 years ago)
Bon accueil, charmant. Bonne cuisine familiale. Menu un peu cher.
Jean-Paul CERNY (6 years ago)
Cadre très agréable Cuisine fait maison Bon accueil Bon rapport qualité prix
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