Château de Montgeoffroy

Mazé, France

The Château de Montgeoffroy is an 18th century manor house located in the commune of Mazé (Maine-et-Loire), France.

In 1676, Érasme de Contades acquired the property. In 1772, the Marshal Louis Georges Érasme de Contades, governor of Alsace, decided to rebuild the château as a retirement home. He called on the Parisian architect Jean-Benoît-Vincent Barré, who worked with the local architect Simier.

The marshal being far from Anjou, the work was directed primarily by his son, le marquis de Contades, his daughter-in-law, Julie Constantin de Marans, his mistress, Hélène Hérault, and her daughter-in-law, Marie-Marguerite Magon de La Lande. It took three years. The old château was burned down, but Barré appreciated its U shape and kept two towers and the moat, as well as the chapel, which dated from 1543.

The building miraculously survived the French Revolution and the Revolt in the Vendée conserving its common buildings, agricultural structures, chapel and park. It also kept its archives and its furniture, which was studied by Pierre Verlet.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Montgeoffroy, Mazé, France
See all sites in Mazé

Details

Founded: 1772
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pascal Guignard (2 years ago)
One of my favourite locations to visit in the area. The visit "à la chandelle" gives an interesting twist to the tourist / visitor's experience !
Oliviu Sarb (2 years ago)
Visited outdoors and the park, quite nice
Vincent J. Miró (2 years ago)
If you are in for authentic second and third rate antiques and nameless paintings this is the place to go otherwise just avoid. I personally have seen far better pieces in a number of private homes where I don't need to pay an entrance fee. Sometimes pretending the small crowd they have treasures for you to see gets a little annoying as when they try to pass off a copy of Rigaud's Loius XIV as by the hand of the painter. The garden is plain, empty and boring but the stables effigy of a horse is so awkwardly drawn it's ludicrous. The exterior is so symmetrically chocolate box it makes you bluff. All in all it's not worth the mention, let alone an hour and a half visit.
Mc J (2 years ago)
One of the best 'chateau'-experiences we had with our kids (around 10). Although you can only visit most of the ground floors and only on a guided tour, it was really interesting. All original furniture and small items from 18th century, all explained in a nice, somewhat ironic way. As the castle ist still privately owned you will also find some fotographs of the current owners... For a few Euros more you can also visit the castles garden and park. Higly recommended as you can freely wander around, sit under trees, find liitle surprises like an old newspaper inlay in an old cupboard in a garden house. So, might be less impressive in terms of architecture than other Loire castles but much more impressions to take home. There is also a pick nick area in the part, a small playground and some farm animals.
John Isaacs (2 years ago)
We visited here a few years ago and were so glad we made the effort, this is a stunning place .
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Externsteine Stones

The Externsteine (Extern stones) is a distinctive sandstone rock formation located in the Teutoburg Forest, near the town of Horn-Bad Meinberg. The formation is a tor consisting of several tall, narrow columns of rock which rise abruptly from the surrounding wooded hills. Archaeological excavations have yielded some Upper Paleolithic stone tools dating to about 10,700 BC from 9,600 BC.

In a popular tradition going back to an idea proposed to Hermann Hamelmann in 1564, the Externsteine are identified as a sacred site of the pagan Saxons, and the location of the Irminsul (sacral pillar-like object in German paganism) idol reportedly destroyed by Charlemagne; there is however no archaeological evidence that would confirm the site's use during the relevant period.

The stones were used as the site of a hermitage in the Middle Ages, and by at least the high medieval period were the site of a Christian chapel. The Externsteine relief is a medieval depiction of the Descent from the Cross. It remains controversial whether the site was already used for Christian worship in the 8th to early 10th centuries.

The Externsteine gained prominence when Völkisch and nationalistic scholars took an interest in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This interest peaked under the Nazi regime, when the Externsteine became a focus of nazi propaganda. Today, they remain a popular tourist destination and also continue to attract Neo-Pagans and Neo-Nazis.