The Pont d'Aël is a Roman aqueduct, located in the comune of Aymavilles in Aosta Valley, northern Italy. It was built in the year 3 BCE for irrigation purposes and supplying water for the newly founded colony of Augusta Praetoria, which is now known as Aosta. The water was directed through a neighbouring valley 66 m above the floor of the Aosta valley, through a sophisticated system. The aqueduct is 6 km long in total. In addition to its unusual position, the construction, which was originally thought to be a three-story structure, shows more unique features such as a control corridor below the water line, as well as explicit private funding. Today, the water channel of the aqueduct serves as a public walking trail.

Besides the Pont d'Aël, two other Roman bridges in the Aosta valley are still intact: the Pont-Saint-Martin in the town of the same name and the Pont de Pierre in Aosta.

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Aymavilles, Italy
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Founded: 3 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lin Lin en Hans Bree (5 months ago)
closed due to covid, otherwise 5 star
Isabel Goegebeur (10 months ago)
The Ancient Roman aqueduct is a landmark not to be missed when you're in the region. It leads to a few interesting mountain walks with wonderful views of the Aosta valley.
Domenico Piccolo (10 months ago)
Ancient Roman waterway bridge (III BC), still strong and durable. What else?
Jennifer Patterson (Jena) (2 years ago)
A wonder...
Nirit GREEN (2 years ago)
Historic Roman bridge and aquaduct. A classic example of Roman engineering and building. Absolutely worth the visit. The surrounding area is also very beautiful.
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