Bjärsjöholm Castle

Ystad, Sweden

Bjärsjöholm or Bjersjöholm Castle is a Renaissance castle from the 16th century. Originally consisting of four brick buildings built around a courtyard, the present castle consists of two buildings, with a newer addition close by.

According the excavations there has been a manor already in the Middle Ages. The site is first mentioned in 1344. Since the 14th century it has been owned by families Munk, Rotfeld, Kaas, Ugerup and Thott. In 1668 Bjärsjöholm was acquired by Ebba Brahe, wife of Jacob de la Gardie. After de la Gardies it has belonged for example to the war marshal Otto Wilhelm Königsmarck.

The newer addition on the estate, the Bergsjöholm Castle, was built in Romantic, German style in 1849-50, on a hill just south of the old castle. It is a three-story building flanked by two square towers. In 1890, one of the Renaissance buildings needed extensive renovations and only the gables could be saved.

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Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Kalmar Union (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Daphne Rondot (8 months ago)
If you are in the area, do not hesitate for a second.
Pernilla Kjellkvist (8 months ago)
Tyvärr var det inte öppet och verkar inte var offentlig men såg spår att det har varit det innan.
Rebecka (8 months ago)
Lite svårt att fatta vad som va rätt och fel på denna plats. Lyckades komma fram tillslut och parkera bredvid en lada. Men häftig upplevelse att få se.
Christer Forsell (3 years ago)
Totally cash, very garbage.
Anna (3 years ago)
Place quite neglected but interesting views, nice place for night photos outside the city, a new private castle and ruins can be seen, the door to a small museum and open chapels. Keep quiet next to the horses. The area is very nice, you can go further to visit the small lake next to Grustag.
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