Köngen Roman Park

Köngen, Germany

Köngen is in the area of the Roman settlement Grinario that was built around 100 AD around a Roman castra. Grinario was the endpoint of the Roman road 'Neckar-Alb-Aare' which originated in Windisch (Switzerland). In 260 the place was destroyed by the Alemanni and the Romans were expelled.

Johann Eberhard Roser discovered some traces in 1782 and started excavations here one year later. At present it is the site of an archaeological park and museum. The earliest reconstructions were those of a Roman corner tower, the originals of which were discovered in 1855. The tower was ready in 1911 and the 'Köngener Römerkastell' with its great viewpoint and small indoor museum soon became a popular excursion.

In World War II and the period short after, the tower was damaged and it was not open to public until 1949. In the 1970s, the tower was fully renovated and a small museum was built next to it.

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Details

Founded: 100 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Germany
Historical period: Germanic Tribes (Germany)

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