Riseberga Abbey Ruins

Fjugesta, Sweden

Riseberga Abbey was a nunnery founded by the Order of Cistercians around the year 1180. The land property of the abbey was donated by Earl Birger Brosa in 1202. After his death Brosa’s wife, Queen consort Brigida Haraldsdotter, moved to Riseberga and she was one of the most famous nuns in the abbey. Brigida has also buried there.

Riseberga became soon very rich and powerful abbey. In the 13th century it owned 224 farms, mines, churches and other properties. In 1384 it was anyway plundered, probably by mercenaries. The destruction began in 1527 when the abbey was returned to the Crown during the Reformation. Former nuns lived there until 1534. The abbey was destroyed by fire in 1546. Later abbey ruins were used to build other buildings nearby. Today only one wall stands still.

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Details

Founded: ca. 1180
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

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User Reviews

Jörgen Wallin (2 years ago)
Fin att promenera med hunden
Lars Albertsson (3 years ago)
Mycket vackert och intressant. Skyltar med utmärkta berättelser om klostret i allmänhet och hur livet var för nunnorna, som levde sitt liv här. Att dessutom vädret var perfekt gjorde ju besöket ännu bättre. ☀️
Ulrika Gedda (3 years ago)
Mycket fint, och bevarat med bra beskrivningar om vad allt är.
Bengt Andersson (3 years ago)
Vackert, lugnt
Urban Karlsson (4 years ago)
Men fint ställe att få besöka
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