Parliament House

Helsinki, Finland

Since 1907 the Parliament of Finland was convened in House of the Estates and Finnish House of Nobility. Both buildings became however too small for the 200 members of the independent Finland Parliament. In 1923 a competition was held to choose a site for a new Parliament House. Arkadianmäki, a hill beside what is now Mannerheimintie, was chosen as the best site.

The architectural competition which was held in 1924 was won by the firm of Borg–Sirén–Åberg. Johan Sigfrid Sirén was given the task of designing Parliament House. The building was constructed 1926–1931 and was officially inaugurated on March 7, 1931. Ever since then, and especially during the Winter War and Continuation War, it has been the scene of many key moments in the nation's political life.

Sirén designed Parliament House in an architectural style combining Neoclassicism with early twentieth century modernism. The exterior is red granite and the façade is lined by fourteen columns with Corinthian capitals. The building has five floors, each of which is unique. The floors are connected by a white marble staircase and famous paternoster lifts. Most important for visitors are the main lobby, the stately Session Hall and the large Hall of State.

Guided tours are arranged in Parliament house. Tuesdays and Fridays you can watch the Parliament in session from the public balcony.

Reference: Wikipedia

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Details

Founded: 1926-1931
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

Rating

3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mini Rag (2 years ago)
We toured only the outside. It is a lovely building with some unique architectural elements. The stonework on the path in front is symmetrical and pretty. The columns of the building make for great backdrops for your pictures, as do the stairs in front. Take a stroll to admire all the little features.
Paavo Palonen (2 years ago)
Nou hissi not good
Linda Vasquez (2 years ago)
I found this angle from the museum.
Patrick Mwangi (2 years ago)
Very beautiful and secure.
Valerie P. (3 years ago)
At least the interiors are great.
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